Honolulu – Lindas Place Hawaii http://lindasplacehawaii.com/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 10:10:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Honolulu – Lindas Place Hawaii http://lindasplacehawaii.com/ 32 32 Center will advance health equity for Asian Americans, NHPIs https://lindasplacehawaii.com/center-will-advance-health-equity-for-asian-americans-nhpis/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 10:10:36 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/center-will-advance-health-equity-for-asian-americans-nhpis/ Mahalo for supporting Honolulu Star Advertiser. Have fun with this free story! According to a DOH news release, the state’s Department of Health and Human Services will receive nearly $3.5 million from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to establish a center of excellence in […]]]>

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Barbarian is the top film amid the late summer box office slump https://lindasplacehawaii.com/barbarian-is-the-top-film-amid-the-late-summer-box-office-slump/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 19:50:05 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/barbarian-is-the-top-film-amid-the-late-summer-box-office-slump/ LOS ANGELES >> Horror film ‘Barbarian’ won the weekend, grossing $10 million according to the studio’s estimate as of Sunday, while the late summer box office doldrums continued. The debut from Disney’s 20th Century Studios director Zach Cregger premiered at San Diego Comic-Con in July and hit 2,340 screens on Friday. “Barbarian” tells the story […]]]>

LOS ANGELES >> Horror film ‘Barbarian’ won the weekend, grossing $10 million according to the studio’s estimate as of Sunday, while the late summer box office doldrums continued.

The debut from Disney’s 20th Century Studios director Zach Cregger premiered at San Diego Comic-Con in July and hit 2,340 screens on Friday.

“Barbarian” tells the story of a young woman (Georgina Campbell) who finds her Airbnb home strangely inhabited by a stranger (Bill Skarsgård) in a half-ruined part of Detroit. It continues to subvert several horror conventions.

The hardly spectacular numbers were expected in an almost always slow September, with the bigger films of the fall and Christmas season many weeks away. Barbarian nearly earned its $10.5 million budget back in its first weekend.

A distant second, but only seen on 810 screens, was Brahmāstra: Part One: Shiva, an Indian Hindi fantasy epic from Star Studios, another Disney subsidiary.

Written and directed by Ayan Mukerji, the film, about a DJ named Shiva who discovers a connection with the element of fire and the ability to awaken a supernatural, super-powerful weapon, made $4.4 million in its first weekend in North America.

Longtime Hollywood classics Bullet Train and Top Gun: Maverick took third and fourth place respectively.

Bullet Train has grossed $92.5 million in six weeks and Top Gun: Maverick has grossed $705.7 million in 16 weeks, making it the fifth-highest-grossing domestic film of all time.

More quiet weeks are likely ahead before a wave of expected big earners arrive in October, including “Halloween Ends” and “Black Adam.”

Soon after, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever kicks off the holiday box office season and an even bigger round of expectations.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday in US and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. The final domestic figures will be released on Monday.

1. “Barbarian”, $10 million.

2. “Brahmastra Part One: Shiva”, $4.4 million.

3. “Bullet Train”, $3.25 million.

4. Top Gun: Maverick, $3.2 million.

5. “DC League of Super Pets”, $2.8 million.

6. “The Invitation,” $2.6 million.

7. “Lifemark”, $2.2 million.

8. “Beast”, $1.8 million.

9. “Minions: The Rise of Gru,” $1.65 million.

10. Spider-Man: No Way Home, $1.3 million.

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Bernard Shaw, CNN’s first anchorman, dies at 82 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/bernard-shaw-cnns-first-anchorman-dies-at-82/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 21:54:01 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/bernard-shaw-cnns-first-anchorman-dies-at-82/ NEW YORK >> Bernard Shaw, a former CNN anchor and pioneering black journalist remembered for his outspoken question in a presidential debate and who calmly reported from Baghdad as the Gulf War began in 1991 when it was under attack, has died. He was 82. He died Wednesday in a Washington hospital of unrelated COVID-19 […]]]>

NEW YORK >> Bernard Shaw, a former CNN anchor and pioneering black journalist remembered for his outspoken question in a presidential debate and who calmly reported from Baghdad as the Gulf War began in 1991 when it was under attack, has died. He was 82.

He died Wednesday in a Washington hospital of unrelated COVID-19 pneumonia, according to Tom Johnson, the former CEO of CNN.

Shaw, a former CBS and ABC journalist, jumped at the chance and accepted an offer to be the anchorman at CNN’s launch in 1980. He later reported on the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Regan in front of a camera hastily set up in a newsroom.

He retired in 2001 at the age of 61.

As moderator of a 1988 presidential debate between George HW Bush and Michael Dukakis, he asked the Democrat — an opponent of the death penalty — if he would support that punishment for someone found guilty of raping and murdering Dukakis’ wife, Kitty.

Dukakis’ cool technocratic response was widely seen as damaging to his campaign, and Shaw later said he received a barrage of hate mail for asking about it.

“Since when does a question hurt a politician?” Shaw said in an interview aired by CSPAN in 2001. “That was not the question. That was the answer.”

Shaw was memorably reporting from a Baghdad hotel room, along with correspondents Peter Arnett and John Holliman, as CNN aired stunning footage of airstrikes and anti-aircraft fire at the start of the US invasion to liberate Kuwait.

“I’ve never been there,” he said that night, “but it feels like we’re in the middle of hell.”

The reports were crucial to the creation of CNN when it was the only cable news network and networks ABC, CBS, and NBC dominated television news. “He popularized CNN,” said Frank Sesno, former head of CNN’s Washington bureau and now a professor at George Washington University.

Growing up in Chicago, Shaw wanted to be a journalist and admired legendary CBS journalists Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite, recognizing this as a pivotal moment.

“For all those years preparing to be an anchor, one of the things I aspired to was being able to control my emotions in the midst of all hell erupting,” Shaw said in a 2014 interview with NPR. “And I personally feel like I passed my rigorous test for that in Baghdad.”

Shaw covered the 1989 Tiananmen Square riot in China and resigned when authorities asked CNN to stop its television show. While at ABC, he was one of the first reporters to the scene of the 1978 Jonestown massacre.

Taking to Twitter, CNN’s John King paid tribute to Shaw’s “soft-spoken but booming voice” and said he is a mentor and role model to many.

“Bernard Shaw exemplified excellence in his life,” Johnson said. “He will be remembered as a staunch advocate of responsible journalism.”

Current CNN executive Chris Licht credited Shaw as a CNN original who appeared on the network to comment just last year.

Armed enough to avoid any semblance of bias that he didn’t vote, Shaw put tough questions to several politicians. He asked Dan Quayle, George HW Bush’s vice presidential pick, if “fear of being killed in Vietnam” led Quayle to join the National Guard in 1969.

In 1961, while a member of the US Marines, Shaw sought out a meeting with one of his heroes, Cronkite, in Hawaii.

“He was the most persistent guy I’ve ever met in my life,” the late Cronkite told The Washington Post in 1991. He was just determined to be a journalist.”

He got a radio job in Chicago, where an early assignment covered a performance by Martin Luther King. Shaw recalled to CNN King, telling him, “One day you’re going to make it. Just do something good.”

By retiring at a relatively young age, Shaw acknowledged the strain on his personal life that came with being a successful journalist. Because of all the things he missed doing with his family while at work, he told NPR, “I don’t think it was worth it.”

His funeral will be private, with a public memorial planned for later, Johnson said. He is survived by his wife Linda and two children.

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Stocks drift lower, extending losses into fourth straight week https://lindasplacehawaii.com/stocks-drift-lower-extending-losses-into-fourth-straight-week/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 21:50:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/stocks-drift-lower-extending-losses-into-fourth-straight-week/ Stocks closed lower on Wall Street on Tuesday, extending the market‘s losses into a shortened holiday week. The S&P 500 fell 0.4% after recovering between a 0.5% gain and a 1% loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.6% and the Nasdaq lost 0.7%. Major indices are emerging from their third consecutive week of losses, […]]]>

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street on Tuesday, extending the market‘s losses into a shortened holiday week.

The S&P 500 fell 0.4% after recovering between a 0.5% gain and a 1% loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.6% and the Nasdaq lost 0.7%.

Major indices are emerging from their third consecutive week of losses, part of a late summer slump that wiped out much of the benchmark S&P 500’s July and early August gains.

Stocks have lost ground as the US Federal Reserve has indicated it will not raise interest rates quickly to bring down the highest inflation in decades.

Additionally, Wall Street is grappling with worries about a looming energy crisis in Europe and the impact it could have on the global economy and corporate earnings, as companies in the S&P 500 derive half of their earnings from abroad, said market strategist Michael Antonelli bei Baird.

“Every day that goes by that we have to talk about an energy crisis or gas shortages or runaway electricity bills in Europe, the less the market can move forward constructively,” he said.

The S&P 500 fell 16.07 points to 3,908.19. The Dow fell 173.14 points to 31,145.30 while the Nasdaq fell 85.96 points to 11,544.91.

Smaller company stocks fell more than the broader market. The Russell 2000 Index fell 17.42 points, or 1%, to 1,792.32.

Technology and communications stocks were among the biggest losers. Intel fell 2.8% and Netflix fell 3.4%.

Bed Bath & Beyond fell 18.4% after the death of its chief financial officer. The company is suffering from a continuing slump in sales and turnover at management level.

The company that Trump Media plans to list, Digital World Acquisition, plunged 11.4% after reports it had not received enough shareholder support for an extension to complete the deal.

ADT rose 16.4% after State Farm announced it would take a 15% stake in the home security company.

Markets in the US were closed on Monday for the Labor Day holiday.

Trading began Tuesday on the New York Stock Exchange after Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy practically rang the opening bell. He advocated a program to attract major investment to his country as it continues to fight Russian forces.

Markets have slipped in recent weeks as inflation remains hot and the Federal Reserve remains on course to raise interest rates further in an attempt to tame persistently high prices. The big concern is that the Fed could go too far in raising rates and apply the brakes too hard on an already slowing economy, potentially causing a recession.

Wall Street has been watching economic data closely for signs that inflation may be easing, which traders hope will give the Fed a reason to ease rate hikes. The Fed has raised rates four times this year and is expected to raise short-term rates by another 0.75 percentage point at its next meeting later this month, according to CME Group.

“There’s now a fairly consistent view that the Fed will be higher for longer and err on the side of inflation reduction versus jobs and growth,” said Mark Hackett, Nationwide’s head of investment research.

Bond yields rose. The 10-year Treasury yield, which drives interest rates on mortgages and other loans, rose to 3.34% from 3.19% late Thursday. The two-year Treasury yield, which tends to follow expectations for Fed action, rose to 3.51% from 3.39%.

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Sally Kaye: Why I’m Not a Republican Anymore https://lindasplacehawaii.com/sally-kaye-why-im-not-a-republican-anymore/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 10:39:13 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/sally-kaye-why-im-not-a-republican-anymore/ When I turned 21 in 1970 and was allowed to vote for the first time, one of my political science professors tried to persuade me to register as a Republican. His thought was that if we as a country wanted to ensure a robust two-party system—primaries were closed then—registering with Hawaii‘s minority party was the […]]]>

When I turned 21 in 1970 and was allowed to vote for the first time, one of my political science professors tried to persuade me to register as a Republican. His thought was that if we as a country wanted to ensure a robust two-party system—primaries were closed then—registering with Hawaii‘s minority party was the way to go. So I did.

Over the next several decades, I found little reason to change: As a registered Republican, I could vote to root out the lunatics at the elementary school level, making the general election a more balanced event. Or so I thought.

But when the Republican Party became more Orwellian (“Orwellianism isn’t just big government, it’s about authoritarianism mixed with lies,” according to Gordon Bowker, biographer of the infamous “1984” author), I gave up.

Finally, Republicans say they’re all about liberty and limited government and don’t want to regulate businesses or guns, but some of them insist they have the right to regulate my body and would like to make my children pray. I could no longer ignore the schizophrenia and hypocrisy that the party has come to represent.

Rs have a tough road ahead of us in our state, but with more than 60 of them on the ballots for the November 8 general election, it’s worth taking a minute or two to review some of their publicly expressed positions.

“Your freedom to swing your fist ends right where my nose begins.” – Oliver Wendell Holmes

Beginning with the party itself, the platform recognizes “the truth that life begins at conception and ends at natural death…regardless of the physical or mental diagnosis made before or after birth.”

Duke Aiona, left, is the Republican nominee for governor after beating rivals BJ Penn and Heidi Tsuneyoshi in the primary. Aiona faces Democrat Josh Green in the November 8 general election. Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

I have seen no offer from the party to pay for the cost of caring for and raising an unwanted child, which recent estimates put at $310,605 from birth to age 17 (average of $18,000 per child per year) or the costs related to the management of a maternal or child medical condition that was once sufficient cause to terminate a fatally defective pregnancy.

Nor have I found a commitment to help with the costs incurred by those who wish to adopt a child due to a forced pregnancy, which Vince Berger, who founded Adoption Services Inc. in 1985, says today ranges from $45,000 to $75,000 be able. In fact, Dr. Berger in an interview that adoption “has slowed across the country, at its lowest level in 45 years.” He believes this is because women have been able to avoid unwanted pregnancies.

What some of our Republican brothers and sisters want for us

Of course, Republican candidates, like their Democratic counterparts, have a lot to say about homelessness, crumbling infrastructure, housing shortages, and the high price of paradise. But some of them show a shocking lack of appreciation for the freedom of others when it comes to agency and freedom of religion:

  • Bob McDermott, who wants to replace US Senator Brian Schatz, says he’s all for Red Hill, but in 2017 he opposed a law that would ensure wider access to information about prenatal care and tried to promote free choice of who to marry , by amending the state’s constitution to end banning same-sex partnerships.
  • Conrad Kress, who wants us to vote US Rep. Ed Case out of office, says the government “doesn’t give us rights as parents; they are our natural rights given to us by God and as such cannot be removed.”
  • Antoinette Fernandez, who is running against Jarrett Keohokalole for Senate District 24, wants to “restore the God-given right to people to have choices. God-given inalienable rights were taken away from the people, forcing our people to come under a tyrannical government.”
  • Joe Akana, who will take over from Jill Tokuda for Rep. Kai Kahele’s congressional seat in November, says his “mantra is faith, family and freedom. Believe in my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, who protects and protects our families and children and defends our liberties.”
  • Sylvia Luke will be up against Seaula Tupai Jr., who, as I mentioned in a previous post, believes that protecting a woman’s rights means forcing her to carry an unwanted pregnancy — no exceptions listed — and herself advocates putting abortion on a special vote. “Countless men” have the opportunity to influence a woman’s right to vote.
  • In Senate District 7, Sen. Lynn Decoite meets Tamara McKay, who believes a one-party system is a “road to socialism” (I suppose she’ll feel free to give up her Social Security benefits when the time comes) and it’s up to the ” Voices of the People” in response to the Supreme Court ruling that Roe v. Wade, which I assume she also wants to try to overturn Hawaii’s 1970 abortion law.
  • David Alcos, who will be running against incumbent Matt Lopresti in District 41, wants to keep “God in our schools and our state,” though he doesn’t elaborate on which (or whose) god he’s referring to.
  • Lorene Godfrey, who will challenge Sen. Glenn Wakai in District 15, said her “one big idea is to get prayer back in schools.”
  • Theodene Allen, who faces Gregg Takayama in District 34, agreed: “If I could reinvent Hawaii, I would encourage it to focus on faith and family first. As a result, I would bring prayer back into schools.”
  • Michael Wilson, who ran for State House District 17 against incumbent Dee Morikawa, said he will “count on the Lord Jesus to bring people together for the sake of ‘we the people’ that we serve.”

I don’t know about you, but the candidate positions above seem to completely ignore the amazing increase in those of us who do not profess any religious affiliation. According to Elizabeth Drescher, an associate professor at Santa Clara University, those who selected “none” would be a religion, making them the largest religious group in the US based on the results of a Pew Research Center poll last year.

Faulty history, misinformed voters

I recently told a young Maui police officer how alarming it is that so many candidates want to force prayer back into the classroom; he amazed me by saying he was all for it. When I asked him what he would say to those who are Jewish, Buddhist, Muslim or atheist, he said, “You can opt out. After all, our founding fathers were all Christians.”

This is clearly a selective reading of history; it was complicated back then and our esteemed founding fathers were not a one-size-fits-all group. In fact, they’ve been everywhere when it comes to state-sponsored religion, prayer, and the like. And let’s not forget: A woman’s right to vote wasn’t even on her radar, as women (and black people) were not considered real people who had any of the real rights or freedoms afforded white men.

Remember when the country was afraid John F. Kennedy would impose his beliefs on everyone? Remember his famous quip, “I’m not the Catholic presidential nominee, I’m the Democratic Party presidential nominee, who also happens to be a Catholic.”

Some of Hawaii’s Republican candidates have turned that on its head: They seem fundamentally devoted to their religious beliefs — and feel comfortable imposing them on others — who also happen to be running for office. And that’s pretty scary.

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Military families are suing the federal government over Red Hill fuel leaks https://lindasplacehawaii.com/military-families-are-suing-the-federal-government-over-red-hill-fuel-leaks/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 20:43:20 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/military-families-are-suing-the-federal-government-over-red-hill-fuel-leaks/ Military families who say they were disgusted by last year’s fuel contamination of the Navy’s drinking water system around Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam are suing the federal government, demanding compensation for physical and mental suffering, medical expenses, lost income and others related Cost Red Hill Disaster. The lawsuit was filed in federal court today on […]]]>

Military families who say they were disgusted by last year’s fuel contamination of the Navy’s drinking water system around Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam are suing the federal government, demanding compensation for physical and mental suffering, medical expenses, lost income and others related Cost Red Hill Disaster.

The lawsuit was filed in federal court today on behalf of four families represented by Kristina Baehr, an attorney with Just Well Law of Austin, Texas, and Honolulu Attorney Lyle Hosoda. More plaintiffs are expected to join the lawsuit as a six-month mandatory waiting period during which families must first seek administrative relief expires. Baehr said her law firm represents about 150 affected families.

The plaintiffs include only the families of the military personnel. Military personnel are prohibited from suing the federal government under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

The Navy said in a statement Wednesday it was not discussing details or providing status updates on specific claims.

“The Navy is focused on ensuring the safety and health of those affected by the November 2021 fuel spill,” the Navy statement said. “Nothing is more important than the health, safety and welfare of our employees, their families and our neighbors. Providing our families and communities with clean, safe drinking water and ensuring their ongoing health and safety concerns are addressed are our highest priorities.”

In November, hundreds of families in the Navy’s drinking water system began reporting fuel odors coming from their faucets, saying they were experiencing nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, burning and itchy skin, and rashes. Navy and state health officials then confirmed what many had already suspected – that fuel from the Navy’s underground fueling facility at Red Hill had contaminated the drinking water. The polluted drinking water well is only 2,400 feet downhill from the tanks, which have a long history of leaks.

The families suing the federal government all say they continue to suffer from numerous diseases in addition to the immediate health effects they were experiencing at the time of the contamination.

Plaintiff Natasia Freeman lived on the Aliamanu Military Reserve with her husband, who is in the Navy, and three children. She had a pre-existing seizure disorder, but was dormant prior to the water pollution, according to the lawsuit. She says she had multiple seizures a day after that and has since suffered from a long list of other health issues, including blood in her urine, clearings on her bladder wall and lesions on her brain.

Her children also have health issues, according to the lawsuit, which says her children had abnormal liver, kidney and pancreas lab results in August.

The lawsuit alleges that the military provided inadequate medical care and providers refused to order basic blood tests to check for toxic exposures.

“Nastasia Freeman’s medical care was riddled with errors, delays, misdiagnosis and medical malpractice,” the lawsuit states.

Jamie Simic, her husband and children, who lived in the Hale Na Koa neighborhood, are also suing. Jamie Simic says she’s had a long list of health issues from being exposed to the water. The lawsuit says doctors have found multiple cysts, legions and tumors throughout her body since she became ill, and her two children suffered from neurological symptoms and respiratory problems, among other health effects.

The lawsuit cites a long list of failures by the military to protect water supplies, including a failure to repair an earlier fuel leak in May 2021 that ultimately led to the November contamination.

“The United States knew that the Red Hill facility had a history of water leaks contaminated by fuel leaks and that if they did not act, further leaks were likely to occur and cause significant damage,” the lawsuit says. “The United States must now pay for the very consequences it knew would happen and risked.”

Red Hill Lawsuit —feint v. USA by Honolulu Star Advertiser on Scribd

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Honolulu beats Curacao to win 2022 Little League World Series title https://lindasplacehawaii.com/honolulu-beats-curacao-to-win-2022-little-league-world-series-title/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 22:09:48 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/honolulu-beats-curacao-to-win-2022-little-league-world-series-title/ Honolulu beats Curacao to win Little League World Series 2022 title | Honolulu Star Advertiser From Associated Press | 08/28/2022 | Updated August 28, 2022 at 1:48 p.m ASSOCIATED PRESS The Curacao players form the third baseline while the Honolulu players form the first baseline before the Little League […]]]>
















Honolulu beats Curacao to win Little League World Series 2022 title | <a class="wpil_keyword_link " href="https://lindasplacehawaii.com/historic-playoff-alabama-cincinnati-michigan-georgia-honolulu-star-advertiser/" title="Honolulu Star Advertiser" data-wpil-keyword-link="linked">Honolulu Star Advertiser</a>



















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The COVID-19 outbreak in the Marshall Islands prompts efforts to donate relief supplies https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-covid-19-outbreak-in-the-marshall-islands-prompts-efforts-to-donate-relief-supplies/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 10:18:41 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-covid-19-outbreak-in-the-marshall-islands-prompts-efforts-to-donate-relief-supplies/ Mahalo for supporting Honolulu Star Advertiser. Have fun with this free story! Until recently, the Marshall Islands had been largely spared from COVID-19 cases. Now the remote nation is grappling with its first significant outbreak, which started in the capital Majuro and has spread to at least eight of its outer islands. In the past […]]]>

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Off the News: Long road to the opening of the elementary school https://lindasplacehawaii.com/off-the-news-long-road-to-the-opening-of-the-elementary-school/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 10:08:30 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/off-the-news-long-road-to-the-opening-of-the-elementary-school/ Off the News: Long road to primary school opening | Honolulu Star Advertiser Editorial | Away from the news Mahalo for supporting Honolulu Star Advertiser. Have fun with this free story! Gary Cordery, who finished third in the Hawaii Republican race for gubernatorial nomination, has filed a complaint in the state Supreme Court about the […]]]>
















Off the News: Long road to primary school opening | <a class="wpil_keyword_link " href="https://lindasplacehawaii.com/historic-playoff-alabama-cincinnati-michigan-georgia-honolulu-star-advertiser/" title="Honolulu Star" data-wpil-keyword-link="linked">Honolulu Star</a> Advertiser



















Editorial | Away from the news

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Gary Cordery, who finished third in the Hawaii Republican race for gubernatorial nomination, has filed a complaint in the state Supreme Court about the format of the election and the fact that voters must choose a single-party list. He’s certainly not the first to criticize the format; Some would prefer a more open elementary school. Continue reading
















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Rep. Patrick Branco’s future is uncertain after losing to Congress https://lindasplacehawaii.com/rep-patrick-brancos-future-is-uncertain-after-losing-to-congress/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 10:16:18 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/rep-patrick-brancos-future-is-uncertain-after-losing-to-congress/ Mahalo for supporting Honolulu Star Advertiser. Have fun with this free story! Rep. Patrick Branco is supporting former rival Senator Jill Tokuda in her congressional campaign and is serving as an unpaid volunteer in Lt. gov. Josh Green to become Hawaii‘s next governor as Branco’s own political future now uncertain after election commercials Names linked […]]]>

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