Maui Tourism – Lindas Place Hawaii http://lindasplacehawaii.com/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 00:55:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Maui Tourism – Lindas Place Hawaii http://lindasplacehawaii.com/ 32 32 The Hawai’i Tourism Authority issues RFPs for visitor education and marketing for the Japanese market https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-hawaii-tourism-authority-issues-rfps-for-visitor-education-and-marketing-for-the-japanese-market/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 00:55:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-hawaii-tourism-authority-issues-rfps-for-visitor-education-and-marketing-for-the-japanese-market/ September 26, 2022 at 2:55 p.m. HST * Updated Sep 26, 2:57 p.m Japanese tourists on Big Island. File photo: Japan Airlines The Hawai’i Tourism Authority has issued a call for proposals for strategic visitor education and marketing and management services for destination brands for the Japanese market. As part of this procurement process, the […]]]>

September 26, 2022 at 2:55 p.m. HST
* Updated Sep 26, 2:57 p.m

Japanese tourists on Big Island. File photo: Japan Airlines

The Hawai’i Tourism Authority has issued a call for proposals for strategic visitor education and marketing and management services for destination brands for the Japanese market.

As part of this procurement process, the agency selects a qualified contractor to provide visitor training and brand management services in Japan.

The contractor’s work will support a new, regenerative tourism model for Hawaii led by the Mission to Mālama Ku’u Home (Care for Our Beloved Home), the agency Strategic Plan 2020-2025 and the community-driven Action plans for goal management.

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Work performance is measured against key performance indicators in accordance with the Tourism Authority’s strategic plan, including increased average daily visitor spend and increased total visitor spend.

All interested applicants are required to register and attend the Tourism Authority’s pre-application conference via Zoom to be briefed on the procurement process and to ask questions. The pre-application conference will be held on September 30 at 3:00 p.m. HST. To register, please visit https://bit.ly/3RbPROh.

Interested applicants must also notify their intent to submit proposals by October 3 at 4:30 p.m. HST. Proposals must be submitted to HTA by October 28, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. HST.

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The new contract begins on January 1, 2023 and replaces the current contract, which is scheduled to end on December 31, 2022.

RFP 23-01 and associated appendices can be downloaded from the Hawai’i State eProcurement System (HIePRO) at hiepro.ehawaii.govor from the RFP page of the HTA website at https://www.hawaiitourismauthority.org/rfps/.

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10 hotels with cultural programs to expand your horizons https://lindasplacehawaii.com/10-hotels-with-cultural-programs-to-expand-your-horizons/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 13:03:44 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/10-hotels-with-cultural-programs-to-expand-your-horizons/ Travel offers people one of the best educational opportunities available. It allows us to explore new places, step out of our comfort zone and connect with people from different backgrounds. And according to data, vacationers are excited about the opportunity to broaden their horizons and change their perspectives during their trips. While the term “Bildungsurlaub” […]]]>
Travel offers people one of the best educational opportunities available. It allows us to explore new places, step out of our comfort zone and connect with people from different backgrounds. And according to data, vacationers are excited about the opportunity to broaden their horizons and change their perspectives during their trips.

While the term “Bildungsurlaub” has been used to reflect Family travel with learning opportunities for children, the term can certainly apply to a surge in general interest in meaningful travel that offers the chance to enrich oneself. According to American Express’ 2022 Global Travel Trends Report, 81 percent of respondents want to visit destinations where they can immerse themselves in local culture and put their tourism dollars back into the local economy. And one of the best ways to do that is by staying at a hotel that offers educational cultural immersion workshops.

The best hotels are mirrors that reflect the places they call home. In addition to engaging members of the community, emphasizing local cuisine and using native materials in design, this culture-focused hospitality philosophy is brought to life at many properties primarily through cultural education programs designed to expand guest opportunities. Throughts.

The cultural education programs listed below teach visitors about local culture in a real, tangible way and provide practical skills that travelers can take home with them.

10 hotels with a cultural program

1. Thai clay form at Four Seasons Resort Chiang Mai (Chiang Mai, Thailand)

Four Seasons Resort Chiang Mai

As part of its ongoing efforts to foster the connection between guests and the Northern Thai way of life, the Four Seasons Resort Chiang Mai A cultural center called the recently opened Chaan Baan which works with the local community to bring attention to ancient crafts such as Thai clay molding.

Rest assured that no prior knowledge of pottery is required to participate in this engaging session. Craftsmen exhibit during the 60-minute workshop In Clay Studio Pottery Share traditional Thai techniques and guide visitors through using the wheel or hand building, then decorate the pottery with glazes made from natural ash.

2. Natural Remedies Workshop at NIHI Sumba (Sumba Island, Indonesia)

NIHI Sumba

NIHI Sumba honors indigenous rituals in its natural healing workshop. Guests can stroll through the organic garden and gather the ingredients to prepare time-honored Indonesian herbal remedies. These include Jamu, an anti-inflammatory drink made from roots, herbs and spices, and serums made from aloe vera and virgin coconut oil to treat sunburn.

3. Maasai Jewelry in Mara Bushtops (Masai Mara, Kenya)

Mara bush tops

Between peeping elephants and lions in the wild on this safari retreat, guests at Mara bush tops in Kenya’s Masai Mara you have a unique opportunity to stay in a stunning camp that showcases natural beauty and local traditions, including its beaded jewellery.

In the East African culture, pearl jewelry is not only used for decoration, but the shapes and colors of the pearls have an individual meaning. Local bead-making experts share the history and importance of the time-honoured craft and guide safari-goers through the process of creating their own works of art.

4. Guided Meditation with a Buddhist Monk at Capella Bangkok (Bangkok, Thailand)

Chapel Bangkok

Finding moments of relaxation in everyday life and on vacation promotes general well-being. Finally, meditation has been shown to help reduce stressthrust emotional regulationcalm the sympathetic nervous system and improve sleep. And in Buddhist culture it is used to develop concentration and attain a contented state of mind.

Pick up the basic elements of this practice from a Buddhist monk in Thailand? Well, that certainly offers some advantages. Monk Prasertthe master of mindfulness meditation from Wat Yannawa, the 200-year-old Ayutthaya-era temple nearby Chapel Bangkok brings serenity and spirituality seekers on a guided journey through their consciousness to inner peace.

5. Tali Kato on Turtle Island (Fiji)

Turtle Island, Fiji

turtle island

turtle island in Fiji is a 500-acre luxury private island resort that employs more than 120 people from the surrounding villages. It features 14 traditional wood and thatch Fijians overlooking a sparkling blue lagoon, and visitors can learn tali katowhat the weaving of traditional Fijian baskets means.

6. Little Ram Oyster Company Farm Tour and Shelling in the Shoals (Southold, New York)

The Swarms

Fishing is an integral part of life in many coastal communities on Long Island’s North Fork, including Southold. The Swarms, a hybrid ‘botel’ housed in a converted marina building that was formerly a fish market and bait shop, embraces the region’s rich aquaculture and natural resources. The robust on site oyster operation run by a local and female family business Little Ram Oyster Companygives guests a chance to learn first-hand about oyster farming, step-by-step shelling techniques, and sample the nuances of the sustainable mussel delicacy (which, fun fact, can filter up to 50 gallons of water per day). against pollutants).

7. Mayan Hammock Weaving at Andaz Mayakoba Resort Riviera Maya (Playa del Carmen, Mexico)

Andaz Mayakoba Resort Riviera Maya

Hammock weaving is a traditional Mayan craft that dates back centuries. While buying a hammock from a Playa del Carmen tourist shop might be an easy way to add a little flair to your home, you certainly won’t learn anything about the history or artistry that goes into the vibrant new decorative item of your affection.

The immersive offering below Andaz Mayakoba Resort Riviera Maya guides guests through the process of turning colorful cords into a functional hammock while learning about Mayan heritage and culture. Then why not try out your new creation during a sunset hang session by the sea?

8. Ukulele Lessons at Montage Kapalua Bay (Maui, Hawaii)

Montage Kapalua Bay

The ukulele was introduced to Hawaiians in 1879, and since then the stringed instrument has become as synonymous with the spirit of aloha as the gentle sound of waves lapping the sand. For many, the mere utterance of the word ukulele conjures up images of strumming sessions under swaying palm trees.

Montage Kapalua Bay strives to preserve Hawaiian traditions through immersive programming. Silla Kaina, the resort’s longtime cultural ambassador, teaches visitors ukulele holding, fingering, and basic chords in an idyllic, breezy setting on Maui’s scenic coastline.

9. Making Agave Paper in Casa Salles (Tequila, Mexico)

Casa Salles

The UNESCO World Heritage-listed city of Tequila in western Mexico’s state of Jalisco is best known for its namesake spirit. But the undistilled plant parts of the blue agave are not simply thrown away.

Casa Salles, a boutique retreat next to an active distillery, has teamed up with local artist Norma Macías Zambrano to turn the discarded agave fibers and other by-products from the production process into paper, just as she does to create art. The immersive classes, held at their studio near the hotel, shed light on the myriad ways people in the region use their most prized plant.

10. “Be a Farmer” at Six Senses Con Dao (Con Dao, Vietnam)

Six Senses Con Dao

While it’s not particularly difficult to find an eco-focused hotel that offers garden tours and farm-to-table cooking classes, Six Senses Con Dao goes one step further. This 5-star beach oasis on the tropical island of Con Dao isn’t just about roaming rows of endemic plants and mingling with wildlife, it’s about gaining a deeper appreciation for long-standing local farming practices.

Guests can feed the chickens, collect eggs from the coop, and learn traditional Vietnamese hand-picking methods for organic vegetables and herbs—all skills you might be lucky enough to practice in your local community garden.

Our editors independently select these products. By making a purchase through our links, Well+Good may earn a commission.

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Library Launches Series of Meet-and-Greet Events for Authors | News, Sports, Jobs https://lindasplacehawaii.com/library-launches-series-of-meet-and-greet-events-for-authors-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 05:03:45 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/library-launches-series-of-meet-and-greet-events-for-authors-news-sports-jobs/ LAHAINA — The Lahaina Public Library will begin a new three-month series of Author Meets and Salutes with the authors of the book on Saturday, September 17 from 2 to 3:30 p.m “Water and electricity in West Maui.” Meet authors Jonathan Scheuer and Bianca Isaki as they discuss their book. Their presentation will […]]]>

LAHAINA — The Lahaina Public Library will begin a new three-month series of Author Meets and Salutes with the authors of the book on Saturday, September 17 from 2 to 3:30 p.m “Water and electricity in West Maui.”

Meet authors Jonathan Scheuer and Bianca Isaki as they discuss their book. Their presentation will be followed by a Q&A session.

“Water and Electricity in West Maui” draws readers’ attention to the ways in which control of water resources in West Maui and throughout Hawaii was key to the creation and maintenance of political and economic power and privilege.

Written by two leading proponents of progressive change in Hawaii, the book highlights what was only touched upon in previous volumes on water rights or land tenure on the islands, with particular attention to the environment, history, and communities of West Maui.

Individual chapters on physical and legal infrastructure are invaluable stand-alone guides to key aspects of water management in the state and in the territory.

One chapter, for example, looks at the state’s recent efforts to restore power flow – a topic otherwise rarely addressed in the published literature.

The book also delves into the inherent flaws and unsustainability of the state of Hawaii’s groundwater management “sustainable yield”, which will have profound implications for the future of Hawaii’s water supply in a changing climate.

Overall, the authors show liberating ways forward with clear explanations of historical change and ongoing bureaucratic practice.

Instead of another discourse on how bad practices of the past have created a beleaguered present, they propose how water and energy can be better shared in West Maui and Hawaii to achieve lasting prosperity for the diverse people in those communities.

“Water and Electricity in West Maui” is of interest to scholars and historians and a must-read for practitioners of water management and control, and contemporary environmental and indigenous struggles in Hawaii and the Pacific.

Scheuer helps organizations deal with environmental conflicts and seeks sustainable prosperity for the people and resources involved.

Isaki is an author, independent attorney, community activist and director of the North Beach-West Maui Benefit Fund.

She received her PhD from the University of Hawaii at Manoa Department of Political Science for research on Asian settler colonialism and plantation worker organizing, completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, returned to Hawaii to teach Women’s Studies, and then graduated summa cum laude from the William S. Richardson School of Law.

Isaki has contributed to the following West Maui-oriented books: “Tourism Affects West Maui” (2016), “Social Change in West Maui” (2019), “Civil Society in West Maui” (2021) and “Water and Electricity in West Maui” (2021).

The schedule also includes:

Sep 24 – Authors Dawn Hegger-Nordblom, Albert Perez and Mason Yamaki discuss chapters out “Thinking about traffic in West Maui;”

Oct. 1 – Authors Sydney Iaukea and Will Caron highlight chapters from “Civil Society in West Maui”;

Oct 8 – Author Kahala Johnson discusses a chapter “Civil Society in West Maui”;

Nov. 5 – Author Brian Richardson presents at the “Index to Lahaina News”;

Nov. 12 – Authors Ikaika Hussey and Jackie Palmer Lasky detail chapters out “Civil Society in West Maui”;

November 19 – Authors Benjamin and Victoria Trevino cover a chapter “Thinking about traffic in West Maui;”

November 26 – Author Ron Williams discusses a chapter “Civil Society in West Maui.”

The Lahaina Public Library is located at 680 Wharf St. near the Port of Lahaina.

For more information on the series, co-sponsored by the North Beach West Maui Benefit Fund, visit www.librarieshawaii.org/events.

If you require assistance/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact the library at least seven days prior to the program date. The library will endeavor to accommodate all requests for accommodation.


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Local ticket sales for the Maui Invitational begin Tuesday and will be digital only | News, Sports, Jobs https://lindasplacehawaii.com/local-ticket-sales-for-the-maui-invitational-begin-tuesday-and-will-be-digital-only-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:51:28 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/local-ticket-sales-for-the-maui-invitational-begin-tuesday-and-will-be-digital-only-news-sports-jobs/ A full house watches as Duke and San Diego State play the 2018 Maui Jim Maui Invitational at the Lahaina Civic Center. The tournament returns to the Valley Isle this year on November 21-23 after the last two events were moved to the mainland due to pandemic restrictions. Maui News / MATTHEW THAYER file photo […]]]>

A full house watches as Duke and San Diego State play the 2018 Maui Jim Maui Invitational at the Lahaina Civic Center. The tournament returns to the Valley Isle this year on November 21-23 after the last two events were moved to the mainland due to pandemic restrictions. Maui News / MATTHEW THAYER file photo

For the first time since 2019, the Maui Jim Maui Invitational will be held at the Lahaina Civic Center and tickets to the event go on sale Tuesday at 10 a.m. HST to local residents, organizer KemperLesnik said in an email to The Maui News.

The men’s varsity basketball tournament will be held Nov. 21-23 — the Nov. 21 first-round matchups are Texas Tech vs. Creighton, Louisville vs. Arkansas, Ohio State vs. San Diego State, and Cincinnati vs. Arizona.

Maui residents can purchase either all-day or single-game tickets, which are available on a first-come, first-served basis. To purchase tickets, residents must visit mauiinvitational.com – all tickets will be digital this year, no paper tickets will be sold on the island as has been the case in the past.

Averaged between the two options (full-day or single-game), the Kama’aina discount is about 36 percent, according to KemperLesnik officials.

Depending on the location, single game ticket discounts are 27 to 50 percent, day tickets are around 26 percent cheaper.

“We are extremely excited to bring the Maui Jim Maui Invitational back to its rightful home on Maui this year after a two-year absence.” Tournament director Nelson Taylor announced this by telephone on Tuesday. “The support of our fans and Ohana on the island is critical to our success and brings across great basketball and great teams. We constantly hear from the mainland teams that the atmosphere at the Lahaina Civic Center is second to none.

“I think you can maybe draw on Bill Self (Kansas coach) or one of our big name coaches that given the size of the venue and the fact that the fans are above the player, the atmosphere certainly rivals the atmosphere of the Final Four can – I think our fans on Maui play a key role in that.”

There is a limit of two tickets per person per transaction, and all Valley Isle residents must have a Maui zip code to purchase tickets. Only Maui residents have access to these tickets, and it will be everyone’s premier opportunity to purchase tickets for a single game.

All-day tickets are located in the North Stands at a center court location – these seats are reserved specifically for Maui residents and are not sold as part of fan travel packages.

This year locals will have the same number of tickets available as in previous years.

“We’re always happy to offer these discounted tickets in a few preferred seats.” Taylor said. “Making some single game tickets available to people on the island before they become available to others on a single game basis and we will always have that allocation for them and plan for each year.

“Same amount (of local tickets) as always, same place. The only difference for us this year is that the pandemic has obviously changed some things operationally. One thing we are doing is moving to digital tickets that can be downloaded to your Apple device or any Android device.”

Taylor is overjoyed to know the event will be back at the LCC after the pandemic forced it to be held in Asheville, NC in 2020 and Las Vegas in 2021.

“None of it is like it’s on Maui at the Lahaina Civic Center.” Taylor said. “Whenever you speak to (Tournament Chairman) Dave Odom, he will always speak to you about the ‘Maui Magic’ and we look forward to being back home. I’ve been over to the Lahaina Civic Center, they’ve had some new billboards come out in the last two years, so this is going to be fun. The decals are still down from (three) years ago.

“It’s almost like we’ve never been away. We have great partners on the island, ourselves and the County of Maui, both with the Parks Department, the Mayor’s Office, our hotels and other people who support the tournament – we’re excited to see everyone again.”

Taylor said the pandemic has put several things into perspective for KemperLesnik, including the fact that they are the best visiting group they can be on Maui.

“We’re going to make a great return to Maui,” Taylor said. “One thing that I think fans can look to when they come to the games is that we really look at how we welcome the return by making sure we’re responsible in promoting sustainable tourism and things promote recycled and reusable gift bags at our merchandise booth and really promote Hawaiian culture appropriately.”

* Robert Collias can be reached at rcollias@mauinews.com


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This resort welcomes a new wave of wellness travel https://lindasplacehawaii.com/this-resort-welcomes-a-new-wave-of-wellness-travel/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 14:04:47 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/this-resort-welcomes-a-new-wave-of-wellness-travel/ At Drip Hawaiʻi, electrolytes, vitamins and antioxidants are formulated into hydrating and nutrient-rich elixirs. However, these healthy cocktails are administered intravenously through so-called infusions. Unlike taking oral supplements, the vitamins and nutrients in IV fluid bypass the body’s digestive system and go directly into the bloodstream with almost immediate effect. celebrities like Adele and Chrissy […]]]>

At Drip Hawaiʻi, electrolytes, vitamins and antioxidants are formulated into hydrating and nutrient-rich elixirs. However, these healthy cocktails are administered intravenously through so-called infusions.

Unlike taking oral supplements, the vitamins and nutrients in IV fluid bypass the body’s digestive system and go directly into the bloodstream with almost immediate effect. celebrities like Adele and Chrissy Teigen swear by these vitamin infusions, leading to infusion rooms and medical spas springing up in metro hubs like New York City and Los Angeles.

On Oahu, Drip Hawai’i is the premier IV wellness and medical spa in Waikīkī. The 700 square meter lounge is located on the second floor of ʻAlohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach. From aesthetic injectables to body contouring devices that utilize radio frequency and electromagnetic energy, spa clients are surrounded by cutting-edge technology and procedures. Drip Hawaiʻi specializes in infusions and carefully crafts liquid remedies target specific needs such as increasing energy, improving athletic performance and speeding recovery from a hangover.

Drip Hawaiʻi also developed IV treatment with travelers in mind. Dubbed the ‘Alohilani Retreat’, the remedy helps to hydrate the body and boost the immune system – the ultimate healing after a long journey. Drip Hawaii founder Tamara Shaffer says that her clients often experience a wave of calm after the ‘Alohilani retreat that lasts for a week.

After a $130 million renovation, the Pacific Beach Hotel was transformed into the ʻAlohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach.
Photo: Courtesy of ʻAlohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach

When guests enter Drip Hawaii’s luxurious lounge, they are greeted with a cup of green tea or a glass of champagne. A qualified nurse then measures the customer’s vital signs. After a brief briefing, the nurse inserts a tiny catheter into a vein in your forearm, which is connected to a bag of vitamin- and mineral-enriched fluid. To reassure those who fear needles, the nurse only pricks the skin once to insert the catheter. Many first-time IV therapy recipients expect the needle to remain in their arm, but it’s a single prick. However, the catheter stays in the vein for about 40 minutes – the time it takes for a 500ml bag of liquid to enter the body. Although it still seems unusual, IV therapy is a refreshing and revitalizing experience. By supporting overall health, Shaffer says these IV treatments can help enhance a trip to Hawaii with their calming and healing properties.

The founder adds that it was fortunate that she opened Drip Hawai’i at ‘Alohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach last April. The property underwent a $130 million renovation, transforming the Pacific Beach Hotel into the ‘Alohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach. In the spring of 2018, the hotel celebrated its grand opening and since its rebirth, a focus on wellness has run through the entire property. Today, Drip Hawaii blends seamlessly into the resort.

“The call for wellness and fitness is louder than ever,” said Matthew Grauso, General Manager of ‘Alohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach. “COVID allowed people to stop and take a look at how to balance life with exercise, diet and sleep,” he notes. Today’s travelers are looking for accommodations and experiences that allow them to maintain a healthy lifestyle while on the go. This heralds a new era of travel.

swell deck

The Swell Restaurant and Pool Bar is located next to the resort’s infinity pool.
Photo: Courtesy of ʻAlohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach

That Global Wellness Institute defines wellness tourism as “travel associated with the maintenance or enhancement of personal well-being”. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the global wellness tourism industry hit a record $720 billion. With travel restrictions tight, it took a big hit in 2020, falling to $436 billion. However, industry experts from the Global Wellness Institute forecast a strengthening of the market, which will reach $817 billion in 2022 and soar to $1.3 trillion by 2025.

ʻAlohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach welcomes this new travel model. In addition to infusion therapy at Drip Hawaiʻi, guests will find exciting offerings that nourish the body rather than disrupting their healthy habits and exercise routines.

Guests have 24-hour access to FIT Waikīkī, the resort’s new fitness center. Set up for travelers who aren’t yet adjusted to Hawaii’s time zone, the 24-hour feature offers a healthy alternative any time of the day. While the new gym also features state-of-the-art cardio and strength equipment, Grauso says FIT Waikīkī focuses on mind, body and spirit. “The vision for FIT Waikīkī was to create a more holistic wellness experience,” he says. Zumba and yoga classes are offered alongside stretching sessions for activities that go beyond traditional training methods. Grauso adds that guests can expect pickleball pitches and batting cages in 2023.

To complete the holistic experience, FIT Waikīkī has teamed up Spa U’ilani for relaxing massages and soothing facial treatments. For residents looking for a forward-thinking gym, FIT Waikīkī offers monthly and yearly memberships for kamaʻāina.

Cocococo

The Earth to Cup menu features specialty cocktails like the Coco Loco, served in a young coconut.
Photo: Courtesy of ʻAlohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach

From the fitness center, the wellness concept flows directly into the Earth to Cup menu at the resort’s pool bar. The curated menu is only available Monday through Thursday from 4pm to 6pm at the Swell Restaurant and Pool Bar. That pūpū dishes are prepared with local ingredients complemented with special cocktails. From samosas stuffed with Maui Surfing Goat Dairy cheese to ceviche from O’ahu Kampachi and bacon-wrapped shrimp from Kaua’i, dishes reflect the richness of the islands. Local spirits like Ocean Vodka and Kōloa Rum go into refreshing cocktails like the Guava Mai Tai or the Swell Hawaiʻi, the bar version of a blue Hawaiian. The coco loco is even served in a young coconut. Here at Swell, Grauso says, “Guests can refuel with dishes made with locally sourced, organic ingredients.” Soon, guests will be able to dine on fresh dishes and relax in a poolside cabana while receiving an IV from Drip Hawaii.

As travelers continue to seek vacations that enhance overall wellness, ‘Alohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach is at the forefront of bringing new wellness experiences to Waikīkī. For visitors, a relaxing stay in Hawaii can connect them to the islands and their healing nature.

For more information on Drip Hawaii, see drophawaii.com For more information on ʻAlohilani Resort Waikīkī Beach, visit www.alohilaniresort.com.

]]> Visitor Industry Charity Walk raises $2.2 million, including $1.05 million in Maui County https://lindasplacehawaii.com/visitor-industry-charity-walk-raises-2-2-million-including-1-05-million-in-maui-county/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 21:03:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/visitor-industry-charity-walk-raises-2-2-million-including-1-05-million-in-maui-county/ Hawaii Lodging & Tourism Association, Visitor Industry Charity Walk. The Hawaii Lodging & Tourism Association announced today that the 43rdapprox Visitor Industry Charity Walk raised $2.2 million to be distributed to local nonprofit organizations. More than 5,000 people across the state took part in this year’s charity walk, which took place simultaneously in four counties […]]]>

Hawaii Lodging & Tourism Association, Visitor Industry Charity Walk.

The Hawaii Lodging & Tourism Association announced today that the 43rdapprox Visitor Industry Charity Walk raised $2.2 million to be distributed to local nonprofit organizations.

More than 5,000 people across the state took part in this year’s charity walk, which took place simultaneously in four counties on August 20. It was the organization’s first personal charity walk since 2019.

“Although there has been some uncertainty surrounding the Charity Walk this year, we are pleased to see that the Aloha spirit remains strong in our community,” said HLTA President and CEO Mufi Hannemann. “To surpass $2 million in our first year back to a live event is amazing and it really speaks to how important Charity Walk is to so many people.”

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43approx Visitor Industry Charity Walk Fundraising Totals by County

“Maui took the lead again with a strong performance, raising just over a million dollars this year. Kudos are also due for the Garden Isle for an amazing charity walk cycle that raised $456,000. And a hearty round of applause to Hawaii Island and O’ahu for their efforts in raising over $350,000 each,” said Hannemann.

(Left to Right) – Dena Roady, Area Vice President – Hyatt Hotels Hawaii and General Manager of Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort, Shane Kahalehau – Program Director at KPOA Radio, Lisa Paulson, Executive Director – Maui Hotel & Lodging association

Hannemann thanked everyone who helped, volunteered, walked and helped in any way to make the Charity Walk possible. “This is the local tourism industry’s way of showing our appreciation to our community and we are grateful to have this opportunity again.”

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The Hawai’i Lodging & Tourism Association is the state’s oldest and largest private organization representing hotels, condominiums, timeshares, other lodging businesses, suppliers and related businesses and individuals related to tourism. HLTA is dedicated to supporting the hospitality industry through education, policy, and membership benefits, and to raising awareness of its contributions across the state.

Organizers note that donations are still coming in, resulting in adjusted totals to previously reported amounts.

Hawaii Lodging & Tourism Association, Visitor Industry Charity Walk.

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Candidate Q&A: Maui County Council East Maui District – Shane Sinenci https://lindasplacehawaii.com/candidate-qa-maui-county-council-east-maui-district-shane-sinenci/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 22:31:13 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/candidate-qa-maui-county-council-east-maui-district-shane-sinenci/ Editor’s note: For the Hawaii general election on November 8th, Civil Beat asked candidates to answer a few questions about where they stand on various issues and what their priorities are if there is an election. The following came from Shane Sinenci, candidate for the East Maui District of Maui County Council. His opponent is […]]]>

Editor’s note: For the Hawaii general election on November 8th, Civil Beat asked candidates to answer a few questions about where they stand on various issues and what their priorities are if there is an election.

The following came from Shane Sinenci, candidate for the East Maui District of Maui County Council. His opponent is Claire Carroll.

For general information see the Civil Beat Election Guide and see other candidates on the general election ballot.

1. What is Maui County’s biggest problem and what would you do about it?

The biggest problem is food security. In the world’s most isolated group of islands, we should be able to support ourselves if ships ever stop importing most of our food. The pandemic has opened our eyes to how global events can negatively affect us.

I proposed the very first statewide Department of Agriculture. With this new division, we can now begin investing in agricultural infrastructure, begin planning for USDA processing facilities, and diversify our economy by producing agricultural products, using agricultural byproducts for pet food and building materials, and engaging in regenerative practices like the Implement composting for carbon sequestration and general soil health.

2. In the last two years alone, the average selling price of a Maui home has skyrocketed by nearly $400,000, driven by a surge in out-of-state buyers during the pandemic. What can the county do to ensure families aren’t overpriced?

Currently, in response to the increase in property valuations, the council increased the residential property exemption tax to $300,000. To attract more local families into homes, the council can set policies that give long-term residents priority over recently moved outside buyers, and subsidize utilities for new homebuyers with funds from the Affordable Housing Fund.

3. Significant efforts have been made in recent years to reform law enforcement and strengthen police oversight. What specifically would you do to improve oversight of local law enforcement? Are you satisfied with the Maui Police Department and the Maui Police Commission?

One possibility is for the county council, which is more evenly represented across the county’s nine wards, to approve the police chief’s appointment.

4. Maui County Council recently passed a temporary moratorium on the construction of new hotels and other visitor accommodation and will decide within the next few months whether to make it permanent. Do you support limiting the number of hotels and visitor accommodations on Maui? Why or why not?

Yes I do, Maui Island’s plan states that there is a visitor to resident ratio of 1:3. With 80,000 visitors on any given day, we surpassed that number; enough to affect the quality of life of the county’s residents.

Our over-reliance on tourism became apparent during the pandemic as the shutdown wreaked economic havoc. We have learned that we cannot rely on the luxury real estate industry to solve our affordable home crisis, but with a moratorium on new visitor accommodation we hope to be able to focus the construction industry on much needed housing for our workforce on the island as ours top priority.

5. Do you think the governor and legislature appreciate Maui County’s problems, or are they too focused on Honolulu and Oahu? how would you change that

I think Maui County is ahead of the state legislature when it comes to government transparency and the Sunshine Law.

All Maui County matters must be approved and requested for public notice seven days in advance, and all decisions must be made in a public forum with public testimony. However, the state legislature is not bound by the same rules. If the committees do not have the necessary votes, they do not have to meet!

Personally, I believe campaign contributions should be curtailed before representatives vote on issues and issues that could easily steer them in a direction.

6. Do you think the county of Maui should do more to manage water resources that have long been controlled by plantations? Why or why not?

Yes, the demands of climate change, agriculture and population growth demand it of us. Water is considered a public trust under the Hawaii State Constitution, and as public officials we have a responsibility to uphold that trust.

Thirty years is just too long to have our most valuable resource controlled by a foreign for-profit corporation, and if that corporation is sold, what then?

A county-led water board will operate independently of the Department of Water Supply and will manage the watershed that feeds the county’s supply system. The current tenants have failed to fix the old plantation system and with the county’s support we can begin to modernize the system to be more efficient.

7. Climate change is real and will force us to make difficult choices. What should Maui County do first to counteract climate change instead of just reacting to it?

Move the Mauka of the Honoapiilani Highway out of the SLR-XA projections, begin construction of South Maui’s north-south link road, and plan for smaller inland district treatment plants in anticipation of sea level rise.

8. It’s estimated that up to a thousand people are homeless on Maui on any given day. What do you think needs to change to help people find and stay in housing?

It will take a community effort to address our homelessness problem; These include agencies such as Veterans’ Affairs, Aloha Psychiatric Services, community church groups, and the Department of Housing and Human Concerns. But before that, some critical systemic changes need to be made:

-— Decriminalize homeless people in county parks and remove penalties that clog the justice system.

– Begin with an inventory of the homeless on DHHL lists, veterans, the mentally ill, drug addicts, and single mothers with children for better appropriation.

— Split the housing and human affairs departments for more focus and efficiency.

9. Traffic on the island of Maui is getting worse and different regions face different challenges. What would be your approach to improving Maui’s transportation problems?

Raising rental car taxes would make little sense if rental car agencies simply passed these costs on to their customers. In addition to carpooling, some companies could adjust their working hours so workers commute to less congested times or offer home office options.

I was excited to support the Ho’omahua initiative during this final budget session, which would manage overpopular websites by implementing a digital phone app that would notify visitors of traffic counts at specific websites and offer alternative nearby websites that they may be able to visit instead.

10. The coronavirus pandemic has exposed numerous flaws in Hawaii’s structure and systems, from outdated technology to economic disparities. If you could take this moment to reinvent Hawaii, build on what we’ve learned, and create a better state, a better way of doing things, what would you do? Please share a great idea you have for Maui County. Be innovative but specific.

My one big idea would be to rethink the Hawaii Tourism Bureau towards a more sustainable model that ensures quality of life for our Hawaiians.

I’ve provided funds to hire an FAA lobbyist in Washington to begin talks with the airline industry; on whether to limit seating capacity, encourage safety video on all incoming flights, and divert flight routes away from densely populated neighborhoods.

Our new focus should appeal to visitors who appreciate our unique and endemic environment that is found nowhere else in the world. Faced with the looming dangers of sea level rise and with an effort to introduce ancient sustainable practices, the reimagined tourism office would encourage more ecotourism models where visitors have the opportunity to plant native trees in our watersheds and drive invasive species out of our estuaries along the coasts .

A similar model is already being established in the Galapagos Islands and this message will encourage visitors to better appreciate our island home.

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Kaitiaki worries that Māui dolphin conservation is being jeopardized by fishing industry profits https://lindasplacehawaii.com/kaitiaki-worries-that-maui-dolphin-conservation-is-being-jeopardized-by-fishing-industry-profits/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 00:00:12 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/kaitiaki-worries-that-maui-dolphin-conservation-is-being-jeopardized-by-fishing-industry-profits/ Kaitiaki Davis Apiti has dedicated the last 22 years of his life to protecting the endangered Māui dolphin. Video / Whakaata Maori Kaitiaki Davis Apiti has dedicated the last 22 years of his life to protecting the endangered Māui dolphin. The critically endangered Māui’s dolphin, or Pōpoto, is a subspecies of the already endangered Hector’s […]]]>

Kaitiaki Davis Apiti has dedicated the last 22 years of his life to protecting the endangered Māui dolphin. Video / Whakaata Maori

Kaitiaki Davis Apiti has dedicated the last 22 years of his life to protecting the endangered Māui dolphin.

The critically endangered Māui’s dolphin, or Pōpoto, is a subspecies of the already endangered Hector’s dolphin. Their habitat is along the west coast of the North Island, from Maunganui Bluff to Whanganui, and there are only 54 specimens left.

“Now we’re seeing the results of the fishing and the destruction he’s caused by this taonga and how we’re going to lose him and we really don’t want that to happen. We really don’t want that,” says Apiti who lives in Aotea Harbor near Kāwhia, also part of the Māui Dolphin Habitat.

Fishing, disease, oil and gas exploration, boat strikes, mining, tourism and noise are all threats to Hector and Māui dolphins. Davis is most concerned about the commercial fishery and wants it banned from the dolphin habitat 20 nautical miles offshore along the west coast at a depth of 100m.

Apiti has been calling for the ban since 2008, when Ngāti Te Wehi campaigned with the Crown to protect Māui dolphin habitat. Apiti says the drop in numbers is like “waiting for a tangihanga.”

In 2016, Apiti brought a case before the Waitangi Tribunal for Ngāti Te Wehi, claiming that the government’s policy to protect the Māui dolphin violated Te Tiriti o Waitangi. But the lawsuit was dismissed.

The claim had an advantage. A new threat management plan has been put in place by New Zealand’s Department of Conservation and Fisheries, which bans commercial driftnets and trawls within four miles of shore, although Ngāti Te Wehi wanted a 20 nautical mile limit.

But Apiti says the reduced limit is a political compromise with the fishing industry. “It’s money. At the end of the day, it comes down to money.”

The plight of the Māui attracted national and international attention. In 2020, DoC and Fisheries reviewed the TMP and expanded the protection zone to 12 nautical miles, but still not to the 20 miles requested by Ngāti Te Wehi and others.

Apiti wants a 20 nautical mile safe zone along the west coast instead of the current 12.

One of the endangered Māui dolphins.  Photo / Included
One of the endangered Māui dolphins. Photo / Included

Fisheries New Zealand spokeswoman Emma Taylor said all of the measures in the latest TMP 2020 were backed by science.

“The scientific evidence does not support a 20 nautical mile ban on gillnets. With current measures banning gillnetting for 12 nautical miles in the main Maui dolphin range, science tells us that any risk from fishing is almost completely removed.”

If the protection zone were further extended to 20 nautical miles, says Ali Brooks, a commercial fisherman from Kāwhia, it would deal a major financial blow to his business.

In reviewing the TMP 2020, four iwi fisheries from the west coast of the North Island were consulted.

One of the iwi fishing forums was Ngā hapū o Te Uru o Tainui, which represented the coastal hapū of Ngāti Maniapoto and Waikato.

Brooks is a part of Ngā Hapū o Te Uru o Tainui.

He said during the TMP’s consultation that all fisheries forums have agreed that action should be taken to help the dolphins, but they also have a priority to protect Māori fishermen.

“Much of this support has been geared towards making sure the Department supports us [fishers] when these measures materialize and impact our livelihoods.”

If the protection zone were further expanded to 20 nautical miles, Brooks said it would mean a huge financial hit to his company, which has already taken a hit. When the 12-mile limit was enforced, he had to shut down.

“It just wasn’t able to survive in the fisheries anymore. So we joined another whānau up here in Kāwhia Moana and switched to trawling… If, for example, we were put out of business by further action now, it’s well over a million dollars in assets rendered useless.”

Brooks is concerned about the impact on biodiversity. Since the 12-nautical-mile ban, rig sharks have come closer to shore and eat more crayfish.

He says he’d rather see a balanced fishery that protects all stocks.

Brooks is also concerned about the number of Māori fishermen working along the west coast. He can only count a few who are still active in the industry.

“If we count the number of dolphins compared to Māori fishermen, we are much more at risk of extinction. Some people would say things like, ‘Oh, but commercially, that’s a pākehā concept’. We have been fishing for our people in our villages as long as we have come here. The commercial term is something imposed on us. We are traditional Māori fishermen at heart.”

But Apiti says it is not tikanga for Māori to want to fish in an area that should be protected for the survival of their taonga.

Scientists, government and companies are working together on a drone project to save the rare dolphin.

Brooks is one of many fishermen who are required to have cameras on their boats as a new conservation measure for Māui dolphins. There are also drones designed to locate the dolphins. But Liz Slooten, a professor of zoology at the University of Otago, says the cameras and drones are far from enough.

“Cameras on boats do nothing to prevent dolphins from dying in fishing nets. They only count dead dolphins, and drones are even less effective because they only ever see a very small fraction of the dolphin population. So it’s totally unrealistic to think that drones can protect dolphins.

“We really need to focus now on stopping this preventable dolphin death, and the best way to do that is by removing fishing nets from their habitat.”

At Aotea Harbour, Apiti says that if the Māui dolphin were to become extinct in its lifetime, it would be “staggering”.

“It’s a fight that few will fight and fight on. And for 22 years it was an uphill battle. It’s been a very, very tough fight but we know we’re here to the end – we’re there to the end.”

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Kinaadman defeats Olivarez and wins the Gov. Jubahib Cup https://lindasplacehawaii.com/kinaadman-defeats-olivarez-and-wins-the-gov-jubahib-cup/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 05:33:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/kinaadman-defeats-olivarez-and-wins-the-gov-jubahib-cup/ Philstar.com September 6, 2022 | 1:33 p.m MANILA, Philippines — Joshua Kinaadman augmented a promising career by officiating at the Governor’s Edwin Jubahib Cup national tennis championships, capping his title win with an impressive 6-1, 6-2 win over Eric Jed Olivarez at the DavNor Tourism and Sports Complex in Davao del Norte last Monday. The […]]]>

Philstar.com

September 6, 2022 | 1:33 p.m

MANILA, Philippines — Joshua Kinaadman augmented a promising career by officiating at the Governor’s Edwin Jubahib Cup national tennis championships, capping his title win with an impressive 6-1, 6-2 win over Eric Jed Olivarez at the DavNor Tourism and Sports Complex in Davao del Norte last Monday.

The fourth-placed Lapu Lapu City ace, who was preparing for a bitter, drawn-out duel with Olivarez and stunned top seed Johnny Arcilla 6-4, 6-4 in the semifinals, found the run much smoother instead of behind a brilliant all-around game , to which his third-placed rival had virtually no answer.

After giving up serves in the first three games, 24-year-old Kinaadman Olivarez broke in the fourth and used that momentum to win the next three, including a shut-out win in the seventh.

It was more of the same thing in the next frame as Cebuano took control with a break in game five, then only added four points as he won the final three games for the P40,000 romp in straight sets.

Olivarez, who also stunned No. 2 Vicente Anasta in the Final Four 6-2 1-6 10-3, pocketed P20,000.

Anasta, meanwhile, teamed with John Mari Altiche as they held off Arcilla and Olivarez in a grueling duel 7-5, 7-6 (3) to secure the crown and top 30,000 pesos in the men’s doubles Open Championship, set up by Governor Jubahib.

Anasta and Altiche had previously outmaneuvered Kinaadman and Jelic Amazona 7-6(5), 6-3, while Arcilla and Olivarez defeated John Alejandre and NJ Enriquez 6-2, 6-2 in the semifinals of the week-long tournament hosted by Darbmuco, Dacup Surveying Office, WEARBEMPCO, Velocity One Realty Ventures, Inc., Haven United Dev’t Corp., Panabos Mayor Jose Relampagos, CFARBEMCO, Marsman Drysdale Agri Business Corp., PBA Party List and Joan Este.

On the podium were Arniel Bendulo-Armando Palac; Butch dela Cruz- Buboy Paradero; and Robert Oliveros-Joey Villanueva, who won the men’s doubles category at the Gov. Jubahib Legends led.

Bendulo and Palac thwarts Marvin Sing and Randy Pracullos, 8-4, to win the Over 40 honors; dela Cruz and Paradero dominated Maui Manulat and Luciano Caiman Jr., 8-2, for the Over-50s crown; while Oliveros and Villanueva won the Over-60s tiara with a similar 8-2 victory over Bob Sabandon and Melchor Sabandon.

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Festivals of Aloha events begin with Banyan Tree Ho’olaule’a | News, Sports, Jobs https://lindasplacehawaii.com/festivals-of-aloha-events-begin-with-banyan-tree-hoolaulea-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 05:07:20 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/festivals-of-aloha-events-begin-with-banyan-tree-hoolaulea-news-sports-jobs/ The Lahaina event includes exhibits, free keiki activities, local food, Maui-Maui artists, plus Hawaiian music and hula with Reiko Fukino, Cody Pueo Pata, Kaniala Masoe, Carmen Hulu Lindsey Falsetto Champion 2022 Lahela Park, Halau Keala Kahinano O Puna and Kason Gomes. WAILUKU – With the subject “Ku i ke ʻ’Aki – […]]]>

The Lahaina event includes exhibits, free keiki activities, local food, Maui-Maui artists, plus Hawaiian music and hula with Reiko Fukino, Cody Pueo Pata, Kaniala Masoe, Carmen Hulu Lindsey Falsetto Champion 2022 Lahela Park, Halau Keala Kahinano O Puna and Kason Gomes.

WAILUKU – With the subject “Ku i ke ʻ’Aki – Standing on the Highest Point” Festivals of Aloha return to Maui County for in-person events in September and October.

Maui Nui’s first Hawaiian cultural showcase, Festivals of Aloha, opens Saturday, September 3 with the Banyan Tree Ho’olaule’a in Lahaina.

Begin the celebration of Aloha at Keawaiki under the Lahaina Banyan Tree with exhibits, complimentary Keiki activities, local food, Maui Made artists and Hawaiian music and hula with Reiko Fukino, Cody Pueo Pata, Kaniala Masoe, 2022 Carmen Hulu Lindsey Falsetto Masters Lahela Park, Halau Keala Kahinano O Puna and Kason Gomes.

Enjoy Aloha Friday at the Queen Ka’ahumanu Center on September 16 from 4pm to 8pm with Hawaiian cultural exhibits, free keiki activities, Hawaiian music and hula.

Maui’s early events continue on Saturday, September 24 with the 20th Richard Ho’opi’i Leo Ki’eki’e Falsetto Contest at the Ritz-Carlton Maui, Kapalua. Doors open at 5:30pm. Tickets go on sale September 5th.

This year, the Four Seasons Maui at Wailea joins the list of special experiences with events beginning October 28th.

Additionally, the Festivals of Aloha events begin on October 1st on Lanai, October 7th on Molokai, and October 15th on Hana.

Event schedules are subject to change; Visit festivalsofaloha.com for the latest updates.

“We’re excited to return to in-person events to celebrate the traditions of Maui, Lanai, Molokai, Hana, and now Wailea,” said Daryl Fujiwara, overall coordinator for Festivals of Aloha.

“We take care of your September and October. There’s something for the whole ohana – Uncle Richard’s Falsetto Contest is celebrating its 20th anniversary at the Ritz-Carlton Maui, Kapalua; day trip to Lanai on October 1st for their Ho’olaule’a; and Hana always overdoing it with 2-3 events a day for a whole week! Wailea rounds off the festival with an unforgettable weekend. Get a festival wristband, check out our schedule and plan your attendance.”

Festival ribbons are $5. Proceeds from the sale of ribbons help run the events. For more information, call or text (808) 870-7546.

Visit festivalsofaloha.com and for the most up-to-date information “how” the festivals on Facebook. Any questions, email to sfdhwaii@gmail.com.

Exploring this year’s theme, in the Hawaiian Dictionary, the related term “aki” (height, peak, peak) is accompanied by the example “Ku i ke ‘aki, stand at the top”, figurative meaning “To be successful”.

Mai uka a kai – from the ‘aki (highest point) of our Ahupua’a to the limu ‘aki’aki below – it is in our best interest to ensure that everything in between is pono.

Let’s all “Ku i ke ‘Aki (Stand on the highest point)”, so that we can succeed for the health and well-being of future generations.

This year’s Festival of Aloha sponsors include the Maui County Office of Economic Development; Hawaii Tourism Authority; Kaulua’e Hawaii; Maui Kuia Estate chocolate; The Original Maui Chips; The Maui Cookie Lady Mitzi Toro; Queen Ka’ahumanu Center; Kauwela Bisquera; One Eighty Board Shop; brand Na Koa; Ari South; Manaola Hawaii; Makaku Maui by Kamaka Kukona; Hana Maui Resort; hana art; Ritz-Carlton Maui, Kapalua; Maui Disposal; Four Seasons Resort Maui near Wailea; Noah Harders; Agnes Mililani Terao Guiana; Lahaina Town Action Committee; Lahaina Restoration Foundation; Ke Kumu Hawaii: Kumu Kumula’au Sing Jr. and Kumu Haunani Balino-Sing; encore; Maui Health; kanile’a ukulele; Goodfellow Bros.; Lahaina Hawaiian Civic Club; Maui Disposal; Haku collective; Papa Ola Lokahi; and Old Lahaina Luau.


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