Hawaii – Lindas Place Hawaii http://lindasplacehawaii.com/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 22:13:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Hawaii – Lindas Place Hawaii http://lindasplacehawaii.com/ 32 32 The FBI arrests a lawyer for a prominent Hawaii deal as part of a broadening corruption investigation https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-fbi-arrests-a-lawyer-for-a-prominent-hawaii-deal-as-part-of-a-broadening-corruption-investigation/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 22:13:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-fbi-arrests-a-lawyer-for-a-prominent-hawaii-deal-as-part-of-a-broadening-corruption-investigation/ HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – There has been another arrest in the high-profile federal case against former city attorney Keith Kaneshiro, Hawaii News Now has learned. Early Tuesday morning, the FBI advanced on the home of attorney Sheri Tanaka in California and took her into custody in connection with the alleged conspiracy. Tanaka represents Mitsunaga & Associates, […]]]>

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – There has been another arrest in the high-profile federal case against former city attorney Keith Kaneshiro, Hawaii News Now has learned.

Early Tuesday morning, the FBI advanced on the home of attorney Sheri Tanaka in California and took her into custody in connection with the alleged conspiracy.

Tanaka represents Mitsunaga & Associates, the engineering and architecture firm embroiled in the public corruption scandal.

Tanaka was indicted by a federal grand jury on Thursday last week.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE:

Hawaii News Now was in the courtroom when the jury chief announced the replacement charges and Assistant US Attorney Michael Wheat asked the magistrate for an arrest warrant.

Tanaka was previously named co-conspirator No. 1 in the original June indictment.

Kaneshiro and Dennis Mitsunaga were charged with conspiracy and bribery along with employees of Mitsunaga’s company – Terri Otani, Chad McDonald and Aaron Fujii.

According to the indictment, the company’s employees contributed nearly $50,000 to Kaneshiro’s re-election campaigns between 2012 and 2016. In turn, Kaneshiro allegedly prosecuted a former employee of Mitsunaga’s company for a crime she did not commit.

The employee had sued the company for discrimination.

A federal judge ultimately dismissed the criminal charges against the former employee for a lack of probable cause.

Records show that Tanaka wrote three letters to Kaneshiro’s office in 2013, one in January, February and then July, accusing the former employee of theft.

Hawaii News Now has seen Tanaka many times prior to indictment in federal court for grand jury trials.

Attorney Sheri Tanaka with Mitsunaga & Associates associates Steven Wong and Glenn Okino exit federal court(none)

She acted as a representative for all Mistunaga & Associates employees who were called to testify, including those who have since been charged.

Tanaka made it known that she disliked news cameras or media coverage of the case.

“Whoever provided the false information to Hawaii News Now, and you in particular, Lynn Kawano, biased the jury, compromised the grand jury and caused irreparable damage to Mitsunaga & Associates,” she said.

At a hearing Tuesday morning, Tanaka was not interviewed, but the attorneys for the other five defendants were.

They had not yet been presented with the substitute charges, but all pleaded “not guilty” on behalf of their clients. The trial is scheduled for March.

Legal experts said it was highly unusual for a private attorney to be charged along with clients.

“The judiciary would have to approve that,” said retired federal defender Alexander Silvert.

Tanaka will be heard in Los Angeles. Legal experts believe she will be allowed to post bail and then fly to Hawaii to appear in court.

Copyright 2022 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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Senator Mazie Hirono meets with Umich students https://lindasplacehawaii.com/senator-mazie-hirono-meets-with-umich-students/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 02:30:36 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/senator-mazie-hirono-meets-with-umich-students/ U.S. Senator Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, spoke to University of Michigan students Friday night at the Michigan Union. The event was co-hosted by the Michigan-Hawaii Student Association (MIHI) and the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association. In an interview with The Michigan Daily, LSA student Ellie Omori-Sampson, founding member of MIHI, said her main goal for […]]]>

U.S. Senator Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, spoke to University of Michigan students Friday night at the Michigan Union. The event was co-hosted by the Michigan-Hawaii Student Association (MIHI) and the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association.

In an interview with The Michigan Daily, LSA student Ellie Omori-Sampson, founding member of MIHI, said her main goal for the event was to promote Hawaiian representation at the University of Michigan. She said she felt Pacific Islanders were underrepresented in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities.

“Even with ‘AAPI,’ ‘PI’ is very underrepresented in AAPI rooms on campus, which I’ve noticed,” Omori-Sampson said. “So bringing a senator from Hawaii who’s Asian American and fighting to also promote Pacific Islander representation…gets something in[the audience’s]mind about being aware of Hawaii, being aware of AAPI groups.” ”

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Michigan Football: Scouting Hawaii’s Offensive Line https://lindasplacehawaii.com/michigan-football-scouting-hawaiis-offensive-line/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 14:06:14 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/michigan-football-scouting-hawaiis-offensive-line/ This series will take a closer look at the offensive line and play calling we can expect from Michigan Football’s weekly opponent. This week we’re taking a look at the offensive line of the Hawaii Rainbow Warriors, a veteran unit with plenty of experience, to see how they fit with Michigan’s defensive line. Throughout the […]]]>

This series will take a closer look at the offensive line and play calling we can expect from Michigan Football’s weekly opponent. This week we’re taking a look at the offensive line of the Hawaii Rainbow Warriors, a veteran unit with plenty of experience, to see how they fit with Michigan’s defensive line.

Throughout the offseason, we’ve heard constant concerns about the Wolverines’ defensive line. “How will they replace Aidan Hutchinson and David Ojabo?” We’re only one game into the 2022 campaign, but the first week has shown a resounding answer to that question, a very balanced and offensive approach that resulted in eight different players Sacks mattered. The CSU Rams weren’t exactly an elite opponent by any stretch of the imagination, but the early performance was quite encouraging, suggesting that Michigan football will likely rely less on an individual star or two and more of a crowd of edge rushers and linemen in the Mixture will bring pressure.

This week, the group meets Hawaii’s Rainbow Warriors, who will be playing their third game. Under the stewardship of freshman head coach Timmy Chang, it was a rough start for Hawaii, a 63-10 home win over Vanderbilt followed by a 49-17 loss to Western Kentucky. In fact, Hawaii was even named by ESPN writer Ryan McGee as one of the ten worst teams in the country, along with Michigan’s opponent next week, UCONN (ranked #7 worst in the nation). This week will likely be similarly fair, with the Wolverines taking a big lead and involving a lot of people.

But getting back to the actual question, let’s take a look at exactly what Michigan needs (or doesn’t need to worry about) when it comes to their defensive front against Hawaii’s offensive line.

HONOLULU, HI – DECEMBER 24: Jared Smart #23 of the Hawaii Rainbow Warriors is hoisted by Ilm Manning #75 after scoring a touchdown in the first quarter against the BYU Cougars of the Hawai’i Bowl on December 24 at Aloha Stadium , 2019 in Honolulu, Hawaii. (Photo by Darryl Oumi/Getty Images)

Left tackle: #75 Ilm Manning (R. Sr., 6’4, 295 lbs.)

Manning is the longest-serving player on that Rainbow Warriors offensive line and has started almost every game for Hawaii since he came to campus as a freshman in 2018. With a total of 47 starts and the extra year of eligibility (COVID), it’s back for new orienteering coach Roman Sapolu, previously at Fresno State. Manning was a 2021 Honorable Mention All-Conference player at Mountain West last season.

Watching the film, Manning is definitely the best of this group, displaying a smooth, quick kick slide as blindside protection. He uses his hands well to stop rushers, can hit independently and restore leverage when needed. However, he gave up a sack against Vanderbilt and also had a false start penalty against Western Kentucky.

Against the run, Manning is solid when it comes to fending off edge rushers and has solid enough footwork to reach full-backs. But Manning, like much of the Hawaii offensive line, lacks the power to consistently push defenders off the line of scrimmage and create gaps and seams for running backs to hit. A solid player, at least by Mountain West’s standards.

Left guard: #66 Sergio Muasau (R. So., 6’0, 315 lbs.)

Muasau will take on that role after starting LG Stephan Bernal-Wendt was injured against Western Kentucky last week. He played a bit in 2020, appearing in eight games according to the Hawaii website, and then entering the game against the Hilltoppers in the second quarter.

Muasau definitely has the least amount of film available, but he’s a fairly fast player who simply lacks the size and power to get much boost in the running game. He also struggled with pass protection against WKU, with a handful of pressure coming from his submission. He struggles to fire his hands accurately and with power, making them easy to beat and thus an easy twist to rush the QB.

Middle: #61 Eliki Tanuvasa (R. Jr., 6’2, 300 lbs.)

Tanuvasa is technically adept on film, but lacks the athletic ability or size to really capitalize on it. Against Western Kentucky, he displayed a quick out-of-hand punch, quickly chested defensive tackles, but was just as quickly driven into the backfield, unable to sit down and anchor and stop the oncoming Bull Rush. Going up against an insanely strong player like Mazi Smith will certainly challenge the undersized center.

And against the run, things didn’t fare much better for Tanuvasa, as he consistently failed to generate movement against the internal rotation of Western Kentucky’s 6’1, 305 lbs. Senior Darius Shipp and the 6’5, 330 lbs. Redshirt Senior Brodric Martin. Michigan Football will field some physically similar players themselves, with Mazi Smith at 337 lbs and Mason Graham at 317 lbs tipping the scales.

Right Guard: #71 Micah Vanterpool (R. Sr., 6’6, 315 lbs.)

Like Manning, Vanterpool was an honorable mention for the All-MWC team last fall after starting in 11 games and dropping just two sacks in the season. Vanterpool is certainly the most stable and versatile player in this group. While Manning is a good pass protector but a weak run blocker, Vanterpool does both at a pretty good level and is actually the best run blocker on the unit, according to Pro Football Focus.

Despite a very long frame at 6ft 6, Vanterpool shows good flex and leverage as a run blocker and when anchoring against the bull rush inside. He struggled a bit with exploding from a standing position, as he was often the last of the five linemen to mess with the man across from them, but once he does he can generate enough movement to help Hawaii, to maintain some semblance of balance in his offense.

Right tackle: #77 Austin Hopp (R. Sr., 6’6, 310 lbs.)

Originally from Minnetonka, Minnesota, Hopp originally became involved with western Illinois after leaving high school. He played four seasons for the Leathernecks and was named a 2018 Phil Steele FCS Freshman All-American. He moved to Hawaii before last season and played for the Rainbow Warriors all year.

Hopp was arguably the weakest link in the Rainbow Warriors’ line of defense, but he was probably my favorite run blocker. He has very long arms but finds it difficult to use them to sever the pass guard, instead leaning well over his feet exposing his chest and negating the leverage of his arms. His footwork can also get a little sloppy at times. Against Vanderbilt, a poorly aimed punch bared his chest rather poorly, leading to a strong arm movement from the Commodore DE and a quick transition into a sack.

However, Hopp’s strengths lie in the running game. It is of sufficient size and strength to dislodge people if it makes close contact. However, he sniffs blocks from time to time. When he gets into defenders, he has a solid squat, drives his legs through the block, and closes the ground to the second level quickly and efficiently. He had a very good reputation in the WKU game, after Vanterpool passed a 3 technique running diagonally towards him, Hopp managed to regain leverage and dig the tackle out far enough to clear a hole for the running back to come out of he could get out seven yards.

Hawaii Offensive Scheme

Timmy Chang runs a fairly similar style of offense to Jay Norvell, with a heavy emphasis on throwing the ball quickly to receivers on shorter haul combinations. However, Chang’s offense fits better under the moniker “run and shoot” than under the airstrike. The main difference is that Run and Shoot emphasizes pre-snap motion to open receivers and get them into advantageous match-ups, and has fewer empty sets on average than Air Raid.

It’s also a little more balanced, and honestly the Rainbow Warriors will likely have a pretty solid running game when they enter the conference portion of their schedule. RB Dedrick Parson showed some very good running skills in his duel with Vanderbilt and the experience of this group will certainly pay off.

However, this probably won’t be pretty against Michigan Football. Hawaii’s offense has been unable to consistently move the ball in both matchups and their OL, while the experienced are very poorly built to take on Michigan’s defensive line. The Hawaii OL simply lacks the size and strength Michigan has in spades. For example, just look at these comparisons:

  • Mike Morris: 6’6, 292 lbs. vs. Ilm Manning: 6’4, 295lbs.
  • Mason Graham: 6’3, 315lbs. vs. Sergio Muasau: 6’0, 315 lbs.
  • Mazi Smith: 6’3, 337 pounds. vs. Eliki Tanuvasa: 6’2, 300lbs.
  • Chris Jenkin: 6’3, 285lbs. vs. Micha Vanterpool: 6’6, 315 pounds.
  • Taylor Upshaw: 6’4, 255 pounds. vs. Austin Hop: 6’6, 310 lbs.

These are not good matchups for the Hawaii OL. Traditionally, the OL is often larger everywhere except at the nose tackle. For Hawaii, they’re only significantly larger in two places, and that’s not even factoring in the speed off the edge that guys like Jaylen Harrell can bring.

Hawaii’s orienteering will do well in Mountain West, but things could get ugly in the trenches against Michigan, and that’s exactly what Jim Harbaugh and Mike Elston want.

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The Hawaii game is the largest point spread in Michigan football history https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-hawaii-game-is-the-largest-point-spread-in-michigan-football-history/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 10:52:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/the-hawaii-game-is-the-largest-point-spread-in-michigan-football-history/ According to oddsmakers, Michigan’s game against Hawaii on Saturday will be a setback. Neither in 1986, when the teams first met, nor in 1959, when Hawaii became a state. No, those who dreamed up the scoring for Saturday’s matchup believe it will resemble one of Michigan’s early 20th-century games. Visit MLives home bets for the […]]]>

According to oddsmakers, Michigan’s game against Hawaii on Saturday will be a setback. Neither in 1986, when the teams first met, nor in 1959, when Hawaii became a state.

No, those who dreamed up the scoring for Saturday’s matchup believe it will resemble one of Michigan’s early 20th-century games.

  • Visit MLives home bets for the latest odds and sports betting promos

The Wolverines are favored with a whopping 51.5 points. MLive could not find an example of greater point distribution in Michigan football history. A database going back to 1995 lists no more than the 45.5 points that favored Michigan against Massachusetts in 2012. (Michigan won that game 63-13.)

For anyone to benefit from a Michigan bet on Saturday, the Wolverines would have to win by at least 52 points. The total (or over/under) for the game is set at 65.5, meaning the expected score is approximately 59 Michigan, Hawaii 7.

At the start of the season, Michigan was a top 10 team and Hawaii was in rebuilding mode with a new coach. The past few weeks have only reinforced those beliefs. Michigan is 1-0 after beating Colorado State 51-7 on Saturday. (The Wolverines were 30.5-point favorites in that game.) Hawaii lost its opener to Vanderbilt 63-10 and fell to Western Kentucky 49-17 on Saturday. Both games were played at home against teams considered significantly inferior to Michigan.

Michigan’s 2016 matchup against Hawaii resulted in a wide spread (36.6 points) and an even bigger lead: Michigan won 63-3.

Since 1995, the Wolverines have been either undefeated or 24-1 when favored by at least 30 points, depending on whether you acknowledge the unofficial 33-point spread against Appalachian State in 2007 (Michigan fans are certainly welcome to dismiss that one). However, Michigan is only 11-14 against the spread in such games.

A 50 point spread is uncommon but not unprecedented in big college football. Alabama has been an eight-team favorite with 50+ points (2-6 against the spread) for the past 10 years. Ohio State has been twice.

While the idea of ​​scoring points had not yet been invented, Michigan’s first teams under Fielding Yost regularly beat opponents by astronomical distances. In 1901, his first year as head coach, the Wolverines went 11-0, not conceding a single point. From 1901 to 1904, Michigan won 20 games by at least 50, including four by three figures.

These were Michigan’s legendary “point-a-minute” teams. To cover Saturday’s spread, Michigan will need a similar performance.

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Hawaiian Airlines pilot duo, mother and daughter, take to the skies https://lindasplacehawaii.com/hawaiian-airlines-pilot-duo-mother-and-daughter-take-to-the-skies/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 01:45:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/hawaiian-airlines-pilot-duo-mother-and-daughter-take-to-the-skies/ Hawaiian Airlines IATA/ICAO Code: HA/HAL Type of airline: Full service carrier Stroke(s): Honolulu International Airport, Kahului Airport Founding year: 1929 CHAIRMAN: Peter Ingram Country: United States Maternal advice is part of growing up, but it’s a little different when Mom’s in the left seat of a jetliner and you’re in the right. That’s what happened […]]]>

  • Hawaiian Airlines Airbus A330-243 N389HA

    Hawaiian Airlines

    IATA/ICAO Code:
    HA/HAL

    Type of airline:
    Full service carrier

    Stroke(s):
    Honolulu International Airport, Kahului Airport

    Founding year:
    1929

    CHAIRMAN:
    Peter Ingram

    Country:
    United States

Maternal advice is part of growing up, but it’s a little different when Mom’s in the left seat of a jetliner and you’re in the right. That’s what happened on a Hawaiian Airlines plane last Friday when a mother and daughter took the controls of a B717 for a day in the Pacific.

Captain Kamelia Zarka and her daughter, First Officer Maria Zarka, shared the flight deck of the Boeing B717 to operate a number of Neighbor Island flights. This was the first time in its 93-year history that a mother-daughter pair had flown for Hawaiian Airlines (Hawaiian). The pair, looking equally proud of each other and appropriately adorned with a lei, greeted passengers as they boarded, shared selfies and encouraged young girls to follow their dreams into the cockpit.

SIMPLEFLYING VIDEO OF THE DAY

Two role models flying together

Captain Kamelia Zarka and First Officer Maria Zarka hang out in their Hawaiian Airlines B717. Photo: Bryan Shirota

Kamelia has been with Hawaiian for three decades, joining the airline in 1992 as a flight attendant. Born and raised in the Kingdom of Tonga, she was the first Tongan woman to drive an airliner. After joining Hawaiian, she set out to earn her pilot’s wings and, after stints with regional airlines, returned to Hawaiian in 1999 as a flight engineer on a McDonnell Douglas DC-10. She later joined the Boeing B767 Transpacific Fleet as First Officer before becoming Captain of the Neighbor Island B717 Fleet.

Captain Kamelia Zarka and First Officer Maria Zarka made history on September 1 as the first mother-daughter pilot team to fly for Hawaiian Airlines. Photo: Bryan Shirota

Kamelia is a passionate advocate and role model for women in aviation, which has been shown to rub off on her two daughters, Maria and Kaimana. She said that flying for Hawaiian Airlines with Maria, side-by-side in the cockpit, was a dream come true.

“I always knew Maria would be an amazing pilot – she’s always been brilliant and professional – but sitting next to her as she flew the plane with such skill and ease still blew me away.”

Working hard earning licenses and building hours, Kamelia spent time teaching flight lessons and often took Maria with her on flights. “Those flights and the trips we took with Hawaiian Airlines for my non-revenue benefits seem to have sparked Maria’s desire to fly. Then Kaimana, my youngest daughter, caught the virus after flying with her sister and later in high school, she too decided to become a pilot.

It’s Captain Mom on the flight deck of the 717 now

It looks like Hawaiian Airlines First Officer Maria is keeping a close eye on Captain Mom, aka Kamelia Zarka. Photo: Bryan Shirota

Before joining Hawaiian in April as a 717 pilot, Maria flew Republic Airways in New Jersey for two years. Maria said that people used to tell her how great it was to fly with her mother and now she has experienced that too. “She is an amazing pilot and learning from her is learning from one of the best. Now I call her Captain Mom.”

“I feel fortunate to have a mother who cares so much and has worked hard to pave the way for other women and myself to be the first Tongan woman to run a commercial airline. And now it’s my turn. I look forward to continuing my mother’s legacy as I make my mark as a Hawaiian Airlines pilot.”

Kaimana follows the same path and studies aeronautics at Emery-Riddle University in Arizona. She has earned her personal and instrument licenses and is on track to join her mother and sister in the cockpit of Hawaiian. With her own flight crew of three, the Zarkas would be an ideal fit for the DC-10, the same aircraft that Kamelia began her piloting career with Hawaiian Airlines.


If you ever fly around the Hawaiian Islands, keep an eye out for these two inspirational pilots.

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Hawaii’s least staffed hospital is also in dire need of more beds https://lindasplacehawaii.com/hawaiis-least-staffed-hospital-is-also-in-dire-need-of-more-beds/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 04:17:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/hawaiis-least-staffed-hospital-is-also-in-dire-need-of-more-beds/ HILO (HawaiiNewsNow) – Officials at the Hilo Medical Center say the facility is in dire need of more beds and frontline nurses as the number of people in the community has surpassed the hospital. According to the Healthcare Association of Hawaii, Hilo Medical Center is the state’s least staffed hospital. Hospital leaders confirm the facility […]]]>

HILO (HawaiiNewsNow) – Officials at the Hilo Medical Center say the facility is in dire need of more beds and frontline nurses as the number of people in the community has surpassed the hospital.

According to the Healthcare Association of Hawaii, Hilo Medical Center is the state’s least staffed hospital.

Hospital leaders confirm the facility has been overwhelmed and understaffed for more than a year. Nurses say these issues directly impact patient care.

Earlier this month, hospital officials invited Hawaii News Now to see firsthand what’s going on in Hilo’s ER, the ICU, and the hospital’s intensive care unit.

At around 10:30 a.m. on a recent weekday, emergency room staff raced against the clock to prepare for a patient suspected of having a stroke.

The hospital broadcast over the public address system: “Emergency Department Stroke Team Activation.”

The woman was pulled from the ambulance and taken immediately for a brain scan.

“It’s a bleed,” a nurse announced to a room crowded with nurses standing by.

A caregiver calls out, “Start the Cleviprex.”

When someone has a stroke, minutes make the difference in whether a person will walk again, whether they will ever speak again, and whether they will ever see their family again.

“She squeezed my hand a bit,” said one of the many nurses standing by the patient’s bedside.

In moments like this, observation is key.

Seconds later, another nurse called a doctor: “I think she’s having a seizure.”

But the reality is – there are times when caregivers are pulled away. And in this job you don’t always get a second chance.

“Unfortunately, things get overlooked,” said Ashley Mae, an intensive care unit nurse at Hilo Medical Center.

“It’s the fact that we’re so full. We can’t take care of all our patients and it hurts because we just don’t have room for them anymore.”

Nowadays they come from everywhere.

“We have outgrown our hospital”

In addition to serving the communities along the 80-mile stretch from Honokaa to Kau, the Hilo Medical Center has become the focal point for patients that the Big Island’s smaller hospitals are not equipped to serve.

It doesn’t stop there.

Sometimes people from other parts of the state are also flown into Hilo.

“We don’t just need more staff,” Mae said. “We’ve outgrown our hospital.”

For more than a year, the facility with 166 beds has not only been full, but also overloaded by up to 30%.

That means there are days when staff have had to find additional space for up to 50 people.

“It’s not fun for patients,” said Tyler Sumner, an emergency room nurse at Hilo Medical Center. “In the emergency room, it’s common for someone to wait more than six hours.”

The once-empty hallways are now crammed with stretchers. The sick are constantly being pushed around.

“Out of 28 (ER) beds, sometimes 24 (patients) are waiting for beds upstairs,” Sumner said. “So you’re playing with four rooms.”

This is because it takes longer for patients to be discharged.

Officials say while some are healthy enough to be discharged, staff shortages at many of the island’s long-term care facilities mean they have to stay – until there’s a place to go.

Another problem is that many of those admitted are sicker than pre-pandemic patients – which is lengthening recovery times.

The problems have caused backlogs in almost all departments.

“We’re just so overwhelmed,” said Caitee McCallister, a registered nurse at Hilo Medical Center’s Progressive Care Unit. “If we come in – tomorrow morning. We see a whole list of patients waiting for us.”

Over in the ICU there are only 11 beds.

“We’re usually full,” Mae said.

Dealing with a serious personnel crisis

Some patients are so ill that they need one nurse all the time – sometimes two.

But due to the severe shortage of staff, these caregivers are few and far between.

“Unfortunately, our patients have suffered as a result,” Mae said.

The personnel crisis hit the Hilo Medical Center particularly hard.

Currently, nearly a quarter of the hospital’s 335 nurses are travelers, flown in from the mainland. And even that is not enough.

“I know I worked five days last week,” Mae said.

That’s a 60-hour week.

She says some 12-hour shifts are so chaotic that caregivers are shocked.

“At the end of the day, we all just sit back and breathe a sigh of relief that we made it,” Mae said. “And that our patients pulled through.”

It’s a cycle that too often puts people’s lives at risk.

“If we can’t give our patients the attention they need, we screw ourselves up. (Thinking) oh if I could have been there for that — I could have done that,” Mae said.

Patients who should have had more time.

There are plans to expand the Hilo Medical Center for the first time in nearly 40 years. But the hospital’s bed expansion project is not yet underway.

The facility is currently seeking over $50 million in funding from the state Legislature.

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nickel-and-dimed to death | Hawaii visitors stagger https://lindasplacehawaii.com/nickel-and-dimed-to-death-hawaii-visitors-stagger/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 21:09:18 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/nickel-and-dimed-to-death-hawaii-visitors-stagger/ No matter how much money they may have, visitors don’t like the feeling of being nailed to death. Had we not heard those exact words countless times in your comments, it might not have caught our attention the way it has right now. Here are some examples. Let us know which comment you agree with […]]]>
nickel-and-dimed to death |  Hawaii visitors stagger

No matter how much money they may have, visitors don’t like the feeling of being nailed to death. Had we not heard those exact words countless times in your comments, it might not have caught our attention the way it has right now. Here are some examples. Let us know which comment you agree with the most.

Lori: I’d rather pay a fee than get nickeled and stomped at every park, beach, and attraction.

Steve: It seems the goal is not to welcome tourists, but to nickel and dip them for all sorts of things. With every trip I find more things that charge a fee, and while some are worthwhile, many are just a way for the state to raise money with little money being spent on improving the park or the area.

Lynn: Budget dictates where people can and will go. This can result in Hawaii losing money from visitors who choose not to go somewhere where they get nicked and paid for everything while on vacation.

Andy: Airlines nickel the travelers over and over again and they are unaware of the fact that they are notoriously hated.

Rita: As a frequent visitor…we already pay higher taxes for staying at Hawaii hotels/resorts…It seems like maybe visitors are being plated to death and not appreciated…Unless the goal of the Hawaiian government is to keep visitors away.

Barbara: I’d rather pay a “visitor’s fee” than pay bells and whistles every day when I want to visit a beach. I understand this concept of visitors participating in the maintenance of Kauai, but please don’t smack me on the head every day during my stay!

Jim: It doesn’t matter how rich you are. Nobody likes to be nickel and dimed.

Jen: We’ve loved traveling to Hawaii for years. But the taxes and fees are getting ridiculous. I feel like Hawaii is making it clear that tourism is not welcome. We usually spend a lot of money there. We don’t go cheap, we want to spend our money where we can go knowing we won’t be plated and dimmed.

Tony: What I think Kauai should avoid is that it looks like Disneyland’s money machine where every time you turn your back you put down more cash and feel like nickels and dimes to death… Where does $ go?

Tana: These islands seem to be nickel and diming tourists, and it’s getting really old and annoying. Hawaii is expensive to travel there and stay there, real people have to save and work extra to go there, all these fees will make the trip even more difficult.

Nickle and diming feels like the opposite of aloha.

It’s not just about how much you charge, but also the perception of the value of both the product being offered and the visitors who are the consumers. At every level, Hawaii clearly missed the boat in this area.

Hotel Prices and Resort Fees: How Does the Average Price of $1,600/Night Sound?

For the most recent state-reported month (see report below), Wailea hotels lead the median rate, charging a whopping $1,136 per night. Excluding taxes and fees, including resort fees. Overall, that averages out to about $1,600/night.

Lodging taxes: the highest in the country.

Lodging taxes for hotels and holiday homes have increased by 3% in the last year. The Hawaii legislature initiated these increases through HB 862. This measure came into force from last October. As a result, the state now has the highest combined lodging tax in the US.

The state parliament approved the lodging tax. Previously, counties received an allotment of the state’s uniform 10.25% lodging tax rate, but that ended. Instead, each county had to add its own 3% surcharge to this existing statewide tax. In addition to these taxes, there is an additional 4.17% GST in Maui and 4.712% GST in other parts of Hawaii. The combined tax on hotels and vacation rentals is approximately 18%.

It’s worth noting that Hawaii residents and visitors pay exactly the same taxes on lodging.

Beachfront Parking Fees in Hawaii.

We recently reported that Maui introduced a paid beach parking system for visitors with potential fees of up to $30. The other islands also have similar plans in the works. So it’s not a question of if, but when and how much.

Entrance fees for visitors to Hawaii State Park.

Of the 50 Hawaii parks in Hawaii, 10 already have visitor entrance and parking fees (these are typically $5 per person and $10 per vehicle). This includes Hanauma State Park, where admission has been increased to $25/person. Hawaii residents are exempt. Visitor entrance fees are also charged for all state parks. We don’t yet know when they will arrive at the other 40 parks, how they will be managed, and what the fees will be.

Airlines and Airline Fees.

Aside from the most competitive routes, airfares to Hawaii are only getting higher. Competition is shifting and has now decreased on most mainland routes. That became evident when flights to Southwest Hawaii were grounded on 10 routes. Airline fees are also resuming and we recently stalled with a huge airline change fee, as we reported.

Can You Avoid Being Nickel-and-Dimed in Hawaii?

One of the differences is that tourists have to pay exorbitant prices for everything, plus various additional fees that local residents do not pay. While it’s true in other countries, it’s far less common when it comes to interstate travel in the US. However, as we pointed out, everyone, including residents, pays the occupancy tax.

Where do taxes and fees go in Hawaii?

As you pointed out, Hawaii has wasted most of its tax dollars in the long run. That leaves us with ridiculously high rates and a largely third world tourism infrastructure. But sometimes we see changes when entry fees are added. A case in point is Diamond Head. Street vendors ran around in front of fees, tunnels and bunkers were not illuminated and the path had to be revised. All of this has been fixed and a stairway added near the top to create an alternate route for visitors.

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After Hawaii Five-0, Scott Caan has landed his next big TV series https://lindasplacehawaii.com/after-hawaii-five-0-scott-caan-has-landed-his-next-big-tv-series/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 14:57:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/after-hawaii-five-0-scott-caan-has-landed-his-next-big-tv-series/ After spending the first 15 years of his career almost entirely as a screen actor, outside of pilots that didn’t make it, Scott Caan turned the TV script up on that status quo first with a recurring role entourage and then with a decade-long starring role on CBS’ influential (if problematic for reasons of their […]]]>

After spending the first 15 years of his career almost entirely as a screen actor, outside of pilots that didn’t make it, Scott Caan turned the TV script up on that status quo first with a recurring role entourage and then with a decade-long starring role on CBS’ influential (if problematic for reasons of their own) drama reboot Hawaii Five-0. After ten years portraying Danno Williams in the Aloha State, Caan took a step back from the small screen to write, produce and star in the upcoming crime drama A day as a lionand that was announced last September He would return to CBS for the drama Topangaland. The fate of this project is unclear at this time, but Caan has now signed on for another major broadcast series that appears destined for an earlier debut.

Scott Caan will star in the new drama alarmaccording to Variety, and fans never have to worry about this project failing as Fox confirmed its direct-to-production order back in May 2022. For the new drama, Caan will join previously cast Dania Ramirez, another entourage Vet who has worked on more fantastic TV series such as There was once and The hit from Netflix that will return soon sweet tooth.

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Weather forecast for Hawaii County for August 23, 2022 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/weather-forecast-for-hawaii-county-for-august-23-2022/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 17:16:00 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/weather-forecast-for-hawaii-county-for-august-23-2022/ Photo credit: James Grenz Hilo Today: Mostly cloudy. Lots of showers in the morning, isolated showers in the afternoon. Altitudes 81 to 87 near shore to about 71 at 4000 feet. Southeast wind up to 10 km/h. Chance of rain 70 percent. This evening: Mostly cloudy with numerous showers. Lows 66 to 73 near shore […]]]>

Photo credit: James Grenz

Hilo

Today: Mostly cloudy. Lots of showers in the morning, isolated showers in the afternoon. Altitudes 81 to 87 near shore to about 71 at 4000 feet. Southeast wind up to 10 km/h. Chance of rain 70 percent.

This evening: Mostly cloudy with numerous showers. Lows 66 to 73 near shore to about 55 at 4000 feet. Breeze. Chance of rain 70 percent.

Wednesday: Partly sunny with isolated showers. Altitudes 81 to 87 near shore to about 71 at 4000 feet. East wind up to 10 km/h. Chance of rain 50 percent.

Kona

Today: Sunny in the morning, then mostly cloudy in the afternoon with numerous showers. Elevations 82 to 87 near shore to 68 to 73 near 5000 feet. Northwest wind up to 10 km/h. Chance of rain 60 percent.

This evening: Slightly cloudy with isolated showers. Lows 70 to 75 near shore to about 56 near 5000 feet. Breeze. Chance of rain 20 percent.

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Wednesday: Sunny in the morning, then mostly cloudy in the afternoon with isolated showers. Elevations 82 to 87 near shore to 68 to 73 near 5000 feet. Breeze. Chance of rain 50 percent.

Waimea

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Today: Mostly cloudy with isolated showers. Heights 68 to 83. East winds up to 10 mph. Chance of rain 50 percent.

This evening: Mostly cloudy with isolated showers. Lows around 68 near shore to 56-64 near 3000 feet. Light east winds up to 16 km/h after midnight. Chance of rain 50 percent.

Wednesday: Partly sunny with isolated showers. Heights 68 to 83. East winds up to 15 mph. Chance of rain 50 percent.

Kohala

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Today: Mostly cloudy with isolated showers. Heights 68 to 83. East winds up to 10 mph. Chance of rain 50 percent.

This evening: Mostly cloudy with isolated showers. Lows around 68 near shore to 56-64 near 3000 feet. Light east winds up to 16 km/h after midnight. Chance of rain 50 percent.

Wednesday: Partly sunny with isolated showers. Heights 68 to 83. East winds up to 15 mph. Chance of rain 50 percent.

South Big Island

Today: Airy. Sunny in the morning, then mostly cloudy in the afternoon with isolated showers. Altitudes around 86 near shore to about 75 near 5000 feet. East wind 10 to 20 mph, decreasing to 20 mph in the afternoon. Chance of rain 50 percent.

This evening: Partly cloudy. Lows around 71 near shore to about 55 near 5000 feet. Northeast wind up to 15 km/h.

Wednesday: In the morning mostly sunny, then mostly cloudy. Airy. Scattered rain showers. Altitudes around 86 near shore to about 75 near 5000 feet. NE winds up to 20 mph turning east at 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon. Chance of rain 50 percent.

puna

Today: Mostly cloudy. Lots of showers in the morning, isolated showers in the afternoon. Altitudes 81 to 87 near shore to about 71 at 4000 feet. Southeast wind up to 10 km/h. Chance of rain 70 percent.

This evening: Mostly cloudy with numerous showers. Lows 66 to 73 near shore to about 55 at 4000 feet. Breeze. Chance of rain 70 percent.

Wednesday: Partly sunny with isolated showers. Altitudes 81 to 87 near shore to about 71 at 4000 feet. East wind up to 10 km/h. Chance of rain 50 percent.

Waikoloa

Today: Sunny with scattered showers in the morning, then mostly cloudy with scattered showers in the afternoon. Elevations 83 to 88 near shore to 69 to 76 over 4000 feet. Northerly winds up to 10mph turning northwest in the afternoon. Chance of rain 50 percent.

This evening: Slightly cloudy with isolated showers. Lows around 74 near shore to 51 to 60 over 4000 feet. Breeze. Chance of rain 20 percent.

Wednesday: Sunny in the morning, then mostly cloudy in the afternoon with isolated showers. Elevations 83 to 88 near shore to 69 to 76 over 4000 feet. Northwest wind up to 10 km/h. Chance of rain 50 percent.

summary

A weak high-pressure ridge north of the islands will keep lighter trade winds in the forecast through Thursday. In the afternoon, a sea breeze develops over the sheltered western slopes of each island. A low trough moving through the state will increase rainfall through Wednesday. More typical, drier summer trade wind weather begins Thursday as the low trough exits the pattern to the west and the crest builds back into the region on Friday.

discussion

Extensive clouds are spreading across the Hawaiian Islands as seen in this morning’s GOES satellite imagery. Local radar continues to show scattered showers developing across the state. These clouds and showers are due to a low trough moving westward through the Hawaiian Islands. Upper air balloon soundings from 2am HST this morning show inversion altitudes hovering around 8,000 to 9,000 feet. This higher than normal inversion level will support deeper cloud development and lead to plenty of shower activity through Wednesday, favoring the late night to early morning hours.
The subtropical ridge north of the islands remains in a weakened state due to a long wave trough slowly sweeping through the central North Pacific Basin. Trade winds remain weaker through Thursday due to this weaker high-pressure crest. Local sea breezes develop each day over protected western sections of each island. Clouds and passing showers tend to favor windward and mountainous areas, with some of the heavier showers moving through leeward zones. However, with this less stable hybrid wind pattern, converging trade winds and ocean breezes can be expected to produce some leeward shower activity in the afternoon.
On Friday we switch back to a more dominant trade wind weather pattern as the long trough north of the islands weakens and the subtropical ridge builds up again over the region. These moderate to brisk trades will continue at least into the first half of next week. Short, transient showers typically favor windward and mountainous areas in the night to early morning hours.

aviation

A weak trade wind will continue to carry bands of light showers from the Pacific towards mainly north-east facing slopes and coasts. A faint surface trough drifting across the islands from east to west will further stimulate shower activity.
AIRMET Sierra is currently in effect for the north- and east-facing slopes of Maui, Molokai and Oahu, and for the Big Island north of the volcano upwind. Conditions are expected to improve after sunrise. Elsewhere VFR conditions will prevail with the exception of isolated MVFR conditions with passing showers.
A light sea breeze returns in the afternoon for Big Island downwind. Mostly clear skies in the morning will be replaced by VFR clouds in the late afternoon and will last into the evening hours.

marine

No major changes to the sea and surf forecast with the morning pack. A ridge to the north and a weak bottom near the islands will sustain light to locally moderate trading through Friday. As the low-level feature moves west and dissipates, the surface ridge will lift north and strengthen, allowing winds to increase over the weekend. Winds are expected to remain below the Small Craft Advisory throughout the week.
The current prolonged south swell will gradually ease further into Wednesday. Much less southerly swell is expected Thursday through Sunday. The current small northwest swell is expected to peak mid-period today and then gradually taper off Wednesday through Friday. Briefly choppy surf along the east-facing coasts will remain fairly low through Friday, with a modest pick-up expected over the weekend as trade winds begin to strengthen.

HFO Clocks/Warnings/Notices

none.

Big Island Now Weather is brought to you by Blue Hawaiian Helicopters.

Check out their Big Island Helicopter Tours today!

Data courtesy of NOAA.gov

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Hawaii seeks end to dispute over astronomy on sacred mountain Mauna Kea https://lindasplacehawaii.com/hawaii-seeks-end-to-dispute-over-astronomy-on-sacred-mountain-mauna-kea/ Mon, 22 Aug 2022 00:29:42 +0000 https://lindasplacehawaii.com/hawaii-seeks-end-to-dispute-over-astronomy-on-sacred-mountain-mauna-kea/ The sun sets behind telescopes atop Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 14, 2019. For over 50 years, telescopes have dominated the summit of Mauna Kea, a site sacred to Native Hawaiians and one of the best places in the world to study the night sky. (Caleb Jones, Associated Press) Estimated […]]]>

The sun sets behind telescopes atop Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 14, 2019. For over 50 years, telescopes have dominated the summit of Mauna Kea, a site sacred to Native Hawaiians and one of the best places in the world to study the night sky. (Caleb Jones, Associated Press)

Estimated reading time: 7-8 minutes

HONOLULU – For more than 50 years, telescopes and the needs of astronomers have dominated the summit of Mauna Kea, a mountain sacred to Native Hawaiians. It’s also one of the best places in the world to study the night sky.

That’s all changing now with a new state law that says Mauna Kea must be protected for future generations and that science must be balanced with culture and the environment. Native Hawaiian cultural experts will have voting seats on a new governing body, rather than just advising the summit’s managers as they do now.

The shift comes after thousands of protesters camped on the mountain three years ago to block construction of a state-of-the-art observatory, leading policymakers and astronomers to realize the status quo needed to change.

The stakes are high as Native Hawaiians seek to protect a site of great spiritual importance. Astronomers hope they can renew 11-year-old state-owned land leases under their observatories and continue making revolutionary scientific discoveries for decades to come. Business and government leaders are eager for astronomy to support high-paying jobs in a state that has long struggled to diversify its tourism-dependent economy.

To top it off, the new agency could offer a world-first test case for whether astronomers can find a way to respectfully and responsibly study the universe from indigenous and culturally significant countries.

“We have been here for centuries. We’re not gone, we’re still here. And we have knowledge that would lead to a viable management solution that would be more comprehensive,” said Shane Palacat-Nelson, a native Hawaiian who helped draft a report that laid the groundwork for the new law.

It’s about the summit of Mauna Kea, which is 13,803 feet above sea level. In 1968, the state leased the University of Hawaii for 65 years on land that the school subleased to leading global research institutions in exchange for a portion of observing time.

Astronomers like Mauna Kea’s summit because its clear skies, dry air, and low light pollution make it the best place to study space from the northern hemisphere. Its dozens of massive telescopes have played a key role in advancing human understanding of the universe, including some of the first images of planets outside our solar system. Astronomer Andrea Ghez used one to prove the existence of a supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, for which she received the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics.

Native Hawaiian activists pray in the background at the base of Mauna Kea in Hawaii on July 14, 2019.  For over 50 years, telescopes have dominated the summit of Mauna Kea, a site sacred to Native Hawaiians and one of the best places in the world to study the night sky.
Native Hawaiian activists pray in the background at the base of Mauna Kea in Hawaii on July 14, 2019. For over 50 years, telescopes have dominated the summit of Mauna Kea, a site sacred to Native Hawaiians and one of the best places in the world to study the night sky. (Photo: Caleb Jones, Associated Press)

But the telescopes have also changed the landscape of the peaks, increasingly angering native Hawaiians who consider the site sacred. The 2019 protests by people calling themselves “kia’i,” or protectors of the mountain, aimed to halt construction of the largest and most advanced observatory to date: the $2.65 billion Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT ), which is supported by the University of California and other institutions.

Law enforcement arrested 38 elders, mostly local Hawaiians, which only drew more protesters. Police withdrew months later after TMT said it would not move forward with construction immediately. The protesters remained in place but closed the camp in March 2020 due to concerns about COVID-19.

The episode prompted lawmakers to seek a new approach.

The result is the new governing body, the Mauna Kea Stewardship and Oversight Authority, which will have a Board of Directors with 11 voting members. The governor will appoint eight. Gov. David Ige has not set a date for announcing his candidates, who will go before the Senate for confirmation. He said more than 30 applied.

Palacat-Nelsen said traditional Native Hawaiian knowledge can help the agency determine how large the footprint of man-made structures like telescopes should be at the summit.

“Are we taking heavy steps? Are we taking easy steps? When do we take steps? said Palacat-Nelsen. “All that kind of knowledge is embedded in most of our stories, our traditional stories that have been passed down.”


It’s not just the Big Island problem, it’s not just a state problem, I think it’s a global problem. I think the world is watching how we deal with it.

-Sen. Donna Mercado Kim, Hawaii State Senator


The board has this expertise because one member of the agency must be a recognized practitioner of Native Hawaiian culture and another must be a direct descendant of a Hawaiian Native who practices the traditions of Mauna Kea.

Central to the Native Hawaiian view of Mauna Kea is the idea that the peak is where gods are allowed to dwell and humans are not allowed to live. A centuries-old chant holds that the mountain is the eldest child of Wakea and Papawalinu’u, the male and female sources of all life. To this day, the mountain attracts clouds and rain, which nourishes forests and freshwater for communities on Hawaii’s Big Island.

Lawmakers drafted the law after a working group of native Hawaiian cultural experts, protesters, observatory employees and state officials met to discuss Mauna Kea. Their report, which devoted a large part to the historical and cultural significance of the mountain, formed the basis of the new law.

Several Kia’i who served on this working group support the authority. The Speaker of the House of Representatives has nominated a Kia’i leader for the board.

However, some longtime opponents of the telescope are critical, raising questions about how broad community support the agency will have.

Kealoha Pisciotta, who has been involved in legal challenges to the Thirty-Meter Telescope and other observatory proposals since 1998, said Native Hawaiians should have at least equal rights on the board.

The Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources is preparing to arrest protesters blocking a road to prevent the construction of a giant telescope atop a mountain some native Hawaiians consider sacred, on the Big Island's Mauna Kea from Hawaii on July 17, 2019.
The Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources is preparing to arrest protesters blocking a road to prevent the construction of a giant telescope atop a mountain some native Hawaiians consider sacred on Mauna Kea July 17, 2019 on the Big Island of Hawaii. (Photo: Cindy Ellen Russell/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP,)

“They don’t really have a say. It’s meant to create the illusion of having consent and representation in a situation where we really don’t,” said Pisciotta, a spokesman for the groups Mauna Kea Hui and Mauna Kea Aina Hou.

Lawmakers said pressure to tackle Hawaii’s telescope patch was coming not only from within the state but also from the US astronomy community.

State MP David Tarnas referred to a report by a committee of astronomers from across the country that said there was a need to develop a new model of collaborative decision-making with indigenous and local communities.

“This is not just a Big Island problem, it’s not just a state problem, but I believe it’s a global problem,” said Senator Donna Mercado Kim. “I think the world is watching how we deal with it.”

The new telescope problem, meanwhile, remains unsolved: its supporters still want to build on Mauna Kea, although they have chosen a site in Spain’s Canary Islands as a replacement.

The head of the University of Hawaii’s astronomy program said the agency could help his own institution by stabilizing “the whole situation” for astronomy on Mauna Kea.

But Doug Simons said he was concerned the agency might not be up and running in time to renew the Summit master lease and subleases.

The main lease provides that all existing telescopes will be decommissioned and their sites restored to their original condition by 2033 unless the state approves an extension.

Simons said it will take at least five or six years to dismantle the telescopes and associated infrastructure. That means new leases need to be ready by 2027 or observatories need to start processing.

“There’s no obvious way out,” Simons said. He said he is urging the agency to be established as soon as possible to maximize time for negotiations and any inevitable legal challenges.

Rich Matsuda, who works for the WM Keck Observatory and was a member of the working group, urged the future board members to “avoid stakeholders with narrow interests who are just trying to make sure they get their piece of the pie.”

Tensions over telescope construction, he said, caused people to lock down and avoid discussing difficult issues surrounding Mauna Kea. The new law’s prioritization of the well-being of the mountain could change that, he said.

“I hope this gives us a chance to change that dynamic if we get it right,” Matsuda said.

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